date(s):
1772-1950
type(s):
Documentary Artifacts; Collection
A1518 Slaves and Slavery Collection Inventory of Slaves and Slavery Collection A1518 EAD by Jaime Bourassa using ArchivesSpace Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center 2016 225 S. Skinker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63105 archives@mohistory.org URL: This finding aid was produced using ArchivesSpace on 2018-09-27 06:25:48 -0500 . English Describing Archives: A Content Standard English Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center Slaves and Slavery Collection A1518 0.25 Cubic Feet (7 folders (96 items)) 1772-1950 Some French and Spanish Processing Information Processed by Dennis Northcott, August 2007 Donor Information The items in this collection have been acquired by the Missouri Historical Society by donation and purchase from a multiplicity of sources. In cases where accession information is readily available, this information has been noted in brackets after the description of the item. Scope and Contents The Slaves and Slavery Collection is an artificial, or subject-based, collection comprising a variety of documents that have been placed in this collection over the years due to their common subject matter. Approximately half of the documents in the collection are receipts for sales of slaves, some of which were recorded in various courts. The collection also includes deeds of emancipation; personal correspondence; and broadsides offering rewards for the capture of runaway slaves. Arrangement The collection is arranged chronologically. In some cases, however, small groups of documents that are part of the same accession, or appear to be part of the same accession, have been retained together and filed by the date range of the documents. Separated Materials The following documents were removed during processing and returned to their original collections: Items Removed: Alphabetical Files--Wiggins, Samuel B. Deed of emancipation signed Samuel B. Wiggins of St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing a 40-year-old mNegro slave named Mary Epps and her two-month-old infant named James Young Epps. Witnesses, Samuel N. Holliday and D. Robert Barclay, November 23, 1863. Recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by Stephen Rice, clerk, November 24, 1863. (transferred September 14, 2000) Blair Family Papers. Broadside advertising a $300 reward offered by John S. Doake (or Doak) of Springfield, Missouri, for the capture of two Negro men: 45-year-old Logan and 21-year-old Dan, April 24, 1857. Civil War Collection. St. Louis Daily Bulletin , Extra , December 11, [1860]. “The Border War. Another Abolition Outrage. They Try to Run Off Forty Slaves. One of the Jayhawkers Shot.” Article regarding the shooting of an abolitionist by Morgan Walker near Independence, Missouri. (transferred July 25, 2000) Civil War Collection. Declarations of emancipation of Alice M., Lucinda, and Winnie Walker, slaves of Washington County, Mississippi, dated headquarters, District of St. Louis, Office of Superintendent of Contrabands, October 26, 1863. [gift of Mrs. Winnie Wade Mollah, French Lick, Indiana, September 23, 1952] (transferred September 2000) Elliott, Newton G. Papers. Unsigned letter, Saline County, Missouri, to N. Elliot [Newton G. Elliott], sheriff, Howard County, Missouri. Regarding an advertisement put up in Fayette about the sale of some Negroes. The letter writer would like to postpone the sale, and also mentions that no names were attached to the advertisement for fear that the Negroes might learn of the impending sale and thus might run away. [gift of Mrs. John Speed Elliott, Charlottesville, Virginia, November 20, 1951] (returned July 2007) Mullanphy Family Papers. Broadside advertising a reward offered by Catharine E. Pitts of St. Charles, Missouri, for the capture of a 20-year-old mulatto slave named Ann, August 7, 1854. Conditions Governing Access The collection is open for research use. Conditions Governing Use For permission to publish, quote from, or reproduce material in this collection, please contact the Archives Reference Desk at archives@mohistory.org . Copyright restrictions may apply. The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of copyright. Photostats and other non-original documents may not be reproduced. Physical and Technical Requirements There are no physical or technical restrictions. Digital Copies The Slaves and Slavery Collection was digitized in 2007. The images may be viewed online by clicking the links beside each item in the inventory. Preferred Citation Slaves and Slavery Collection, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis. African Americans Fugitive slaves -- United States Slaveholders -- United States Slavery -- United States Slaves -- United States Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States Slave trade -- United States Negative photostat of deed of emancipation executed by Pierre Francois Devolsay and his wife, Elizabet Coulon Devillier, at St. Louis of the Illinois, freeing a 10-year-old girl named Francoise, whom they have raised as their own child from her earliest years. Francoise will continue to live with them until she is provided for by marriage. (in French, includes translation) 1772 June 22 1 1 Agreement regarding the sale of a slave named Esther from Patrick Henry to Peter Perkins in North Carolina. (Notation on the back of the document reads, A Manuscript of Patrick Henry presented to me by the Rev. Edward Fontaine, [signed] Robt.[?] Dalton). D01374 1784 May 3 1 1 Agreement signed Patrick Henry, May 3, 1784 Typescript copy of the sale of a slave. (Original document was signed by Francisco Cruzat, and was transcribed on April 21, 1914, and returned to Mrs. J.L. McCormick). (in Spanish, includes translation) 1786 1 1 Negative photostat of handbill of Ignatius Davis, dated Frederick-Town, Maryland, offering a ten-dollar reward for the return of his mulatto slave named Arch. 1793 June 24 1 1 Deposition signed Jean McElduff, a resident of Kaskaskia, before J. Edgar, a justice of the peace in St. Clair County, Territory of the United States Northwest of the Ohio River, stating that a Negro named Ben was the property of Jean Boyce or Jonathan Ousley. Document includes declaration signed Wm. Henry of Woodford County, July 23, 1790, stating that he sold a 17-year-old Negro named Ben to Jean Boyce; and declaration signed Jonathan Ousley and J. Edgar, June 7, 1794, stating that Ousley renounces his rights to Ben, whom he bought from Jean Boyce, but had not paid the agreed price by the agreed date, and thus he returned to Boyce his rights to Ben (in French, includes translation). Filed with this document are some accounts in German, written on the back of a printed receipt of the Illinois Central Railroad Line dated 186-. D01384 1794 June 28 1 1 Deposition signed Jean McElduff, a resident of Kaskaskia, before J. Edgar, a justice of the peace in St. Clair County, Territory of the United States Northwest of the Ohio River, June 28, 1794 Receipt for the sale of a one-year-old female slave named Tabb from Isaac Holman of Rowan County, North Carolina, to Jacob Holman, also of Rowan County (Notation on the back of the document certifies that the bill of sale was registered, October 19, 1796). [gift of Mrs. J.T. Doneghy] D01211 1796 Feb 25 1 1 Receipt for the sale of a one-year-old female slave named Tabb, February 25, 1796 1803-1851 Receipt for the sale of two slaves named Sam and Rachel from Uriah Taylor to George Smith of Kentucky. (Notation on the back of the document states that the document was recorded in St. Louis County, Missouri Territory). [gift of Mrs. A.P. Fletcher] D01351 1803 Feb 7 1 1 Receipt signed Uriah Taylor, February 7, 1803 Affidavit of Jesse L. Page recorded by W.W. Kitzmiller, justice of the peace for St. Louis County, Missouri, states that he arrested a colored man named Henry Williams, who is believed to be a runaway slave. Bottom of document contains note signed W.W. Kitzmiller to the keeper of the common jail of St. Louis County directing him to detain the slave. [gift of Mrs. A.P. Fletcher] 1851 Sept 4 1 1 Affidavit of Jesse L. Page recorded by W.W. Kitzmiller, justice of the peace for St. Louis County, Missouri, September 4, 1851 Deed of emancipation signed George Keys of St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing his slave named Jacob, whom Keys had purchased from Charles R. Hall, trustee of the children of Mary R. Tunstall, deceased. Witnesses, R. Dowling and R.M. Field. Recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by M.S. Cerre, clerk, February 28, 1851. [gift of Mrs. A.P. Fletcher] D01206 1851 Feb 26 1 1 Deed of emancipation signed George Keys of St. Louis County, Missouri, February 26, 1851 1805-1830 Bill of sale of slave named George from Teunis G. VanDevour to Jonathan Rhea. (Accompanying typescript note states that Jonathan Rhea was a major in the American Revolution and quartermaster general of New Jersey during the War of 1812). [gift of John H. Gundlach, St. Louis] D01409 1805 Oct 16 1 1 Bill of sale signed Teunis G. VanDevour, October 16, 1805 Agreement between a colored woman named Lucy, Peter D. Vroom, Sr., and Peter D. Vroom, Jr. Lucy was born a slave, was manumitted by Henry Van Middlesworth, and became the covenant servant of Peter D. Vroom in an agreement dated May 1, 1823. Lucy agrees to bind her son Abraham Tromp as an apprentice and servant to Peter D. Vroom, Jr., the present governor of New Jersey. Document includes note signed P.D. Vroom, dated October 14, 1859, certifying that Abraham Tromp remained with him under the indenture until he became 21, when his full term of service expired. [gift of John H. Gundlach, St. Louis] D01691 1830 Nov 20 1 1 Agreement between a colored woman named Lucy, Peter D. Vroom, Sr., and Peter D. Vroom, Jr., November 20, 1830 Receipt for the sale of a Negro boy named Adam from Christopher Clark, executor of Andrew Donald, deceased, to Reuben Coward. D01207 1807 Jan 1 1 1 Receipt for the sale of a Negro boy named Adam, January 1, 1807 Blank manifest of slaves intended to be transported from the port of New York. D01385 circa 1808 1 1 Blank manifest of slaves, ca. 1808 Document signed [signature illegible]. "Being sick, I pray Mr. Pierre Collette to receive the payment which is due me for the rent at the fort at Plaquemines of my two Negroes, Candide and Jean Louis. . . ." (in French, includes translation) D01349 1809 Dec 31 1 1 Document [signature illegible], December 31, 1809 Letter signed N. Wilson, Ste. Genevieve, to Wm. B. Robertson, near Nashville, Tennessee. Discusses the death of Robertson’s Negro named Phil, whom Wilson had hired, and offers a payment as compensation for the loss. (Notation on the back of the document relates the circumstances of Phil’s death; mentions Alexander Craighead). [purchased from Forest H. Sweet, Battle Creek, Michigan, September 27, 1954] D01360 1811 July 27 1 1 Letter signed N. Wilson, Ste. Genevieve, to Wm. B. Robertson, near Nashville, Tennessee, July 27, 1811 Petition of Billy Tarlton to the court of common pleas in St. Louis County. States his request to sue for his liberty, as he was born free and was taken by force from Virginia and sold as a slave in Kentucky and then was sold to Jacob Horine, who brought him to St. Louis where he is now held as a slave. [accession number 76-0028] D01413 1813 Sept 22 1 1 Petition of Billy Tarlton to the court of common pleas in St. Louis County, September 22, 1813 Receipt for the sale of a 16-year-old Negro slave named Lucy from Antoine Chenie of St. Louis County to Joseph Brazeaux (son of Louis Brazeaux). Chenie purchased Lucy from Jacob Bollinger at Ste. Genevieve the previous October. (Includes business card of A.W. Brooke, secretary and auditor, American Refrigerator Transit Co., with notation on the back: Joseph Brazeau was my grandfather-in-law). D01692 1814 Jan 1 2 Receipt for the sale of a 16-year-old Negro slave named Lucy, from Antoine Chenie of St. Louis County, January 1814 Reproduction of receipt for the sale of a mulatto boy slave named Isaac from Dennis Callahan of Bath County, Virginia, to William Callahan, also of Bath County. [accession number 65-0067] 1819 Jan 20 1 2 Letter signed P. Mellen [U.S. Senator Prentiss Mellen], Washington, to Samuel A. Bradley, Fryeburgh, Maine. Senator Mellen briefly discusses the Missouri Compromise, stating in part, “Here we are. Maine and Missouri are all the rage. We have taken the question as to slavery in Missouri, and the vote was yesterday. For interdicting slavery--16. Against it--27. We are now battling the watch as to the question whether the Senate will sanction the junction of the subjects in one bill by agreeing to the committee’s amendment. I am afraid they will.” [purchased from Forest H. Sweet, Battle Creek, Michigan, February 20, 1956] D01693 1820 Feb 2 1 2 Letter of U.S. Senator P. Mellen, Washington, to Samuel A. Bradley, Fryeburgh, Maine, February 2, 1820 Typescript copy of letter of M. Stokes [U.S. Senator Montfort Stokes], Washington, to John Branch, governor of North Carolina. Discusses the Missouri Compromise. (Typescript is on the letterhead of John H. Gundlach, St. Louis. Original letter was in his possession). 1820 Feb 27 1 2 Document signed M. [Marc] Lafitte, notary public of the city of New Orleans, regarding the sale of two female mullatoes, 19-year-old Francoise and 16-year-old Adalaide, property of Auguste Chouteau of St. Louis and brought to New Orleans for sale by Louis Menard to Madame Eugenie Delassize, widow of Louis Avart, of New Orleans. (in French, with typescript translation) [accession number 60-0116] D01694 1822 Dec 20 1 2 Document signed M. Lafitte, notary public of the city of New Orleans, December 20, 1822 Petition of Winny, a free woman of color, to the St. Louis Circuit Court. She states that she and her three children, 7-year-old Malinda, 4-year-old Harry, and 1-year-old Lorinda, held in slavery by Rufus Pettibone, who purchased or obtained them from Thomas Whitset and Owen Wingfield. John Whitset (alias John Whitesides), his wife, Phebe, and son Thomas possessed Winny as a slave, and moved (circa 1792) from Kentucky to the Territory of the United States North West of the River Ohio, at or near a place then known as New Design or Whitesides’ Station. Winny contends that she was held in slavery in violation of the laws of the Territory of the United States North West of the River Ohio. Around 1796, John, Phebe, and Thomas Whitset moved to Upper Louisiana in the neighborhood of St. Louis, and brought Winny with them in slavery, against her consent. Upon the death of John Whitesides, Winny remained enslaved to Phebe and Thomas Whitesides until about 1817 or 1818, when she was purchased by Rufus Pettibone. Winny further states that she successfully sued Phebe for her freedom in the Missouri Supreme Court, yet Rufus Pettibone refuses to liberate her. Also includes affidavit of Winny, dated May 16, 1825. D01695 circa 1825 May 16 1 2 Petition of Winny, a free woman of color, to the St. Louis Circuit Court, May 16, 1825 Promissory note of unknown individual [signature is missing] to Francis Nash for the hire of a black boy named Henry. Verso contains the name John P. White. [accession number 59-0034] D01696 1829[?] 1 2 Promissory note of unknown individual to Francis Nash, ca. 1829 Two documents relating to the estate of Russell Farnham: (1) Bill of William Carr Lane for medical attendance he provided to Gabriel, a slave belonging to the deceased [Russell Farnham], who was stabbed in the chest by William Mundy. Mundy had agreed to pay the bill, but had not done so. Notation on verso of document reads, "Received November 4, 1835, of the administrator $10.30," signed William Carr Lane. (2) Undated petition of Charles, a man of color, by his friend William Austin. The petition states that Charles is held as a slave by Pierre Chouteau, administrator of the estate of Russell Farnham. On October 17, 1831, Russell Farnham executed a document agreeing to free Charles after he paid $250 to Savage & Bostwick and then served Farnham for one year. The petition further states that Charles served William H. Savage, and then paid Farnham $250; however, Farnham died before he could execute the document to free Charles. Judgment of the court states that Pierre Chouteau, administrator, should be discharged from his liability for the amount of the appraisement of Charles above $250. D01697 1833 Apr 28 1 2 Bill signed Wm. Carr Lane, April 28, 1833 1834-1835 Receipt for $400 for the sale of a 14-year-old Negro girl from John G. Ball of Callaway County, Missouri, to John C. Swon of St. Louis, Missouri. Witness, Wm. C. Kennett. [gift of Miss Lucy S. Kennett] D01366 1834 Mar 10 1 3 Receipt for $400 signed John G. Ball of Callaway County, Missouri, March 10, 1834 Receipt for $300 for the sale of a 13-year-old Negro slave girl named Martha Ann from Orin Smith to Jno. C. Swon of St. Louis. Document is dated Newport, Kentucky. Witness, Wm. C. Kennett. Signed Orin Smith and Saml. T. Smith. [gift of Miss Lucy S. Kennett] D01357 1835 Jan 29 1 3 Receipt for $300 signed Orin Smith and Saml. T. Smith, January 29, 1835 Receipt for $450 for the sale of a Negro woman named Meraia and her son Joseph from Stre. [Sylvestre] Labadie to Capt. C. Swon. D01381 1834 Nov 12 1 3 Receipt for $450 signed Stre. Labadie, November 12, 1834 Receipt for $750 in land for the sale of a Negro man named Stephen and a Negro woman named Mary from Bailey N. Johnson of St. Charles County to William L.[?] Sampson. Witness, Thos. Hopkins. D01344 1834 Dec 6 1 3 Receipt for $750 in land signed Bailey N. Johnson of St. Charles County, December 6, 1834 Receipt for $800 for the sale of a 28-year-old Negro slave named William from Anne Collet to McGunnegle & Way. Witness, Robert Collet. [gift of Edward V. Papin] D01346 1835 Dec 8 1 3 Receipt for $800 signed Anne Collet, December 8, 1835 Receipt for $1,000 for the sale of a Negro girl named Dehlia from James Bell of Knox County, Tennessee, to Howell Hinds. Document is dated Natchez. D01353 1836 Feb 15 1 3 Receipt for $1,000 signed James Bell of Knox County, Tennessee, February 15, 1836 Statement of property advanced to Robert and Sally Warren Dunlap by F. Nance on June 6, 1832, December 2, 1834, and August 13, 1835. Property includes several slaves. [accession number 71-0008] D01158 1836 Feb 18 1 3 Statement of property signed F. Nance, February 18, 1836 Papers relating to the estate of Benjamin Jones (Wm. C. Lane and Franklin Raborg, administrators). (1) Receipt of Mrs. Jones to Anne Fine, signed Anne Fine, St. Louis County, May 18, 1837, for $5 for delivering a black woman. (2) Report of slaves belonging to the estate of Benjamin Jones, hired out until Christmas next at public auction at the late residence of the deceased, by order of the administrators of the estate on June 20, 1837. Includes names of slaves hired out, to whom hired, and amount of wages until Christmas. Document sworn and subscribed to by Wm. Carr Lane and Franklin Raborg, August 7, 1837. (3) Report of the slaves belonging to the estate of Benjamin Jones, hired out until January 1 next at public auction at the courthouse door in the city of St. Louis by order of the administrators of the estate on January 1, 1838. Includes names of slaves hired out, to whom hired, and amount of wages until January. (4) Receipt signed Rachel Wetherspoon, St. Louis, April 16, 1838, for $10 for delivering Negro named Kitty of child and attendance. (5) Receipt signed G.W. Call, St. Louis, February 1, 1839, for medical attendance he provided. (6) Receipt signed A. Hoffman, St. Louis, February 16, 1839, for digging grave for Rachel’s child, belonging to the estate of Benjamin Jones. (7) Receipt signed Margaret Brown, St. Louis, February 20, 1839, “for services rendered Rachel in her confinement, a slave belonging to said estate.” (8) Printed blank summons to testify at a trial in the city of St. Louis, dated 183-. Notation on verso reads, in part, “. . . on account of Ramsay C. Jones, a minor.” 1837-1839 1 3 Receipt of Mrs. Jones to Anne Fine, signed Anne Fine, St. Louis County, May 18, 1837 Report of slaves belonging to the estate of Benjamin Jones, August 7, 1837 Report of the slaves belonging to the estate of Benjamin Jones, January 1, 1838 Receipt signed Rachel Wetherspoon, St. Louis, April 16, 1838 Receipt signed G.W. Call, St. Louis, February 1, 1839 Receipt signed A. Hoffman, St. Louis, February 16, 1839 Receipt signed Margaret Brown, St. Louis, February 20, 1839 1838-1852 Receipt for $800 for the sale of a 17-year-old Negro named Henry from John B. Lesperance of St. Louis, Missouri, to G.W. Berkley of St. Louis, Missouri. Witness, Thos. Talbott. [gift of Captain Charles M. Berkley, November 1931] D01378 1838 May 21 1 3 Receipt for $800 signed John B. Lesperance of St. Louis, Missouri, May 21, 1838 Receipt for $440 for the sale of a Negro slave named Joe from DuBouffay Fremon, administrator of the estate of Antoine DuBreuil, to George W. Berkley. By order of the probate court of St. Louis County, DuBouffay Fremon was required to sell at auction the following slaves of the estate of Antoine DuBreuil: Philip, Joe, Celeste and her infant Marie, Louise and her infant Ignace, Julie and Frank. George W. Berkley was the highest bidder for the slave Joe. [gift of Captain Charles M. Berkley, November 1931] D01334 1844 Apr 16 1 3 Receipt for $440 signed DuBouffray Fremon, administrator of the estate of Antoine DuBreuil, April 16, 1844 Letter signed Matthew P. Lee, Arcola, Loudon [Loudoun] County, Virginia, to G.W. Berkley, St. Louis, Missouri. Writes regarding the hire of Silas. “. . . . A man by the name of Monroe has agreed to give him one hundred and eighty dollars--$110 to you and the balance to Silas and Silas agrees to clothe himself and to make good all loss time that is to mak[?] your $110 certain with good security and the loss time and clothing out of Silas part. . . .” [gift of Captain Charles M. Berkley, November 1931] D01389 1844 Oct 7 1 3 Letter signed Matthew P. Lee, Arcola, Loudon [Loudoun] County, Virginia, to G.W. Berkley, St. Louis, Missouri, October 7, 1844 Receipt for $300 for the sale of a Negro boy named George from James H. Allison and Robert Allison to George W. Berkley. [gift of Captain Charles M. Berkley, November 1931] D01376 1845 May 9 1 3 Receipt for $300 signed James H. Allison and Robert Allison, May 9, 1845 Receipt of $700 for the sale of a 17-year-old Negro girl named Sharlott from B.M. Lynch to Geo. W. Berkley. [gift of Captain Charles M. Berkley, November 1931] D01390 1852 Oct 8 1 3 Receipt of $700 signed B.M. Lynch, October 8, 1852 Facsimile reproduction of letter signed J.Q. Adams, Quincy, to Edmund Quincy, Boston. Adams declines Quincy’s invitation to the Massachusetts State Anti-Slavery Society’s celebration of the anniversary of the abolishment of slavery in the colonial possessions of Great Britain. D01362 1838 July 28 1 4 1839-1854 Receipt for $1,000 for the sale of a 45-year-old Negro woman named Vilot (alias Violett) and all of her children from John Sefton of St. Louis County, Missouri, to William W. Greene and Augustus R. Chouteau of St. Louis County, Missouri. This "being the same family of negroes for which four suits are now depending in the circuit court of St. Louis County in the name of Henry Dodge administrator of Israel Dodge deceased, the first against Margaret S. McNair, the second against Charles DeWard, the third against Thomas Hensley and the fourth against Joseph S. Buchannon. [accession number 70-0033] D01337 1839 Apr 24 1 4 Receipt for $1,000 signed John Sefton of St. Louis County, Missouri, April 24, 1839 Deed of manumission signed Taylor Blow of St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing a 30-year-old Negro slave woman named Nicene Clark, wife of Henry Clark. Witnesses, Henry W. Williams and J.R. Barret. Taylor Blow had acquired the slave from the estate of Milton Duty. Includes acknowledgment of the deed by Taylor Blow, recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by William J. Hammond, clerk, April 28, 1854. [accession number 70-0033] D01370 1854 Mar 31 1 4 Deed of manumission signed Taylor Blow of St. Louis County, Missouri, March 31, 1854 Letter signed Samuel Dobbin, Madison, [Indiana], to Capt. [Walter W.] Sherman, [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania]. Expresses apprehension about the arrangement he made regarding the shipping of a slave woman to Ste. Genevieve. [accession number 76-0002] D01335 1841 Jan 13 1 4 Letter signed Samuel Dobbin, Madison, [Indiana], to Capt. [Walter W.] Sherman, [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], January 13, 1841 Receipt for $1,200 for the sale of “a Negro man named Alfred, one Negro woman & two children named Winney & Margaret and Montgomery, one Negro boy named Randolph one yellow girl named Sarah and one named Martha” from Felix Coonce to Saml. Gaty. [gift of W.P. Coonce] D01348 1841 Dec 28 1 4 Receipt for $1,200 signed Felix Coonce, December 28, 1841 Letter signed K[enneth]. Mackenzie, St. Louis, to Gabriel S. Chouteau. “Being informed that the Negro woman and children bid off by me at the Court House on Monday last claim that they are free, and that a suit has been instituted for the purpose of obtaining their freedom, I have to inform you that I decline to pay for, or receive them, because at the time of sale I understood that there was no dispute regarding the title to them as slaves.” D01375 1843 May 3 1 4 Letter signed K. Mackenzie, St. Louis, to Gabriel S. Chouteau, May 3, 1843 License of the St. Louis County Court granted to Jane Brackenridge, a free Negro, allowing her to reside in the state of Missouri. D01365 1844 Mar 4 1 4 License of the St. Louis County Court granted to Jane Brackenridge, a free Negro, signed Jas. St. Wilburne, clerk, March 4, 1844 Broadside advertising a $200 reward offered by Wm. Russell for the capture of five runaway slaves, namely, 40-year-old Washington Reed, known by the name of Washington; 30-year-old Mary, his wife; 12-year-old Fielding, their oldest child; 6-year-old Matilda, their second child; and 4-year-old Malcolm, their youngest child. These slaves have been in possession of Thomas Allen for the last few years. D01383 1847 Oct 1 1 4 Broadside advertisement, October 1, 1847 Notarized receipt for $400 for the sale of a 12-year-old Negro boy named George from James Hurley [or Huling] of Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, to William D. Dougherty of New Orleans. Witnesses, William G. Latham and Guy Duplantis. Signed by Joseph Roberts Beard, notary public, New Orleans, November 29, 1848. [gift of David C. Loker] D01382 1848 Nov 27 1 4 Notarized receipt for $400 signed Joseph Roberts Beard, notary public, New Orleans, November 27, 1848 1852-1950 Document signed R.W. Johnson, lieutenant, U.S. Army. States in full, “Simon was born on the 26th day of November 1819 and consequently will be 33 years old next November.” 1852 Apr 30 1 4 Document signed R.W. Johnson, lieutenant, U.S. Army, April 30, 1852 Document signed Elizabeth Pease (by Jno. Thomas, agent), states in full, "The boy Simon is authorized to hire himself on any good boat running between this port & St. Louis or in the St. Louis & Missouri river trade. For the purpose of procuring a berth when not employed on any boat he is authorized to pass & [word unclear] in St. Louis. In case he requires any reffrence for any purpose he is authorized to refer to Capt. Sellers of St. Louis." Document dated New Orleans. D01332 1856 Apr 3 1 4 Document signed Elizabeth Pease [by Jno. Thomas, agent], April 3, 1856 Document signed Jno. Thomas, attorney for Elizabeth Pease, 23 Commercial Place, states in full, “This is to authorize the boy Simon to take charge of the boy Dick & Simon is authorized to take him with him on any boat he may engage his own services on either running in the St. Louis & New Orleans trade or in the St. Louis & the Missouri River trade. Should Dick be able to get wages at any time for services any party may pay same over to the boy Simon he being authorized to receive them.” Document dated New Orleans. Notation of L.T. Woods, clerk, dated St. Louis, June 3, 1856, reads, “Original filed on board steamer St. Nicholas .” D01339 1856 Apr 28 1 4 Document signed Jno. Thomas, attorney for Elizabeth Pease, 23 Commercial Place, April 28, 1856 Typescript letter signed Harry G. Smith, Wetaskiwin, Alberta, to Charles van Ravenswaay, director of the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis. Regarding donation of documents; states that “Simon, mentioned in these papers was owned by a Mrs. Elizabeth Pease of England. All his wages and those of the boy Dick, were paid to her attorney Jn. Thomas Atty of 23 Commercial Place New Orleans. Just previous to the beginning of the Civil War Simon took ‘french leave’ and eventually arrived in Chicago Ill, becoming a tenent on Father’s small acorage new Chicago.” D01159 1950 June 6 1 4 Deed of emancipation signed Alfred Chadwick of St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing a 32-year-old Negro slave woman named Milly and an 11-year-old Negro slave girl named Bell (alias Isabella). Chadwick frees these two slaves in consideration of $600. Chadwick had purchased these two slaves from Elkanah English and Catherine English on July 1, 1850. Witnesses, Saml. A. Holmes and Jas. R. Lackland. Document recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by M.S. Cerre, clerk, December 6, 1852. Includes notation of St. Louis Circuit Court Clerk Stephen Rice, April 26, 1861, certifying that the foregoing document is a true copy of the deed of emancipation. D01345 1852 Dec 6 1 4 Deed of emancipation signed Alfred Chadwick of St. Louis County, Missouri, December 6, 1852 Deed of emancipation signed Polley Graves of St. Louis, freeing her 35-year-old slave James Young. Graves frees her slave in consideration of $650. Witnesses, Lucien Carr and George Marshall. Includes statement of Lucien Carr and George Marshall, certifying this deed, recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by Michael S. Cerre, clerk, January 26, 1853. [gift of Mrs. Mildred Ruedi Shannon, St. Louis, August 27, 1956] D01356 1853 Jan 22 1 4 Deed of emancipation signed Polley Graves of St. Louis, January 22, 1853 1853-1859 Receipt of $300 for the sale of a 5-year-old slave named Addelline from John Wells to Josiah Camp. Dated Montgomery County, Missouri. [gift of Emil Rosenberger, Montgomery City, Missouri] D01361 1853 July 27 1 4 Receipt for $300 signed John Wells, Montgomery County, Missouri, July 27, 1853 Receipt of $900 for the sale of a 13-year-old Negro slave named Henry from H.H. Camp to Josiah Camp. [gift of Emil Rosenberger, Montgomery City, Missouri] D01410 1859 Oct 29 1 4 Receipt of $900 signed H.H. Camp, October 29, 1859 Deed of manumission signed August Gamache and Catharina Ciders Gamache of Carondelet, St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing a 12-year-old mulatto boy named William Ciders, the son of Louisa, deceased. Witnesses, Augustus A. Blumenthal and Matilda Emore. Includes a notation signed Augustus A. Blumenthal, March 14, 1854, stating that this deed of manumission "is a true copy of an original paper drawn up by me at the request of Auguste Gamache and Catharina Ciders Gamache. . . ." In this note he describes the scene when the document was written and mentions others in attendance: Frank Emore; a servant girl named Carolina; a daughter of Paul Robert; and his wife, Carolina Blumenthal. [accession number 57-0109] D01367 1854 Mar 14 1 5 Deed of manumission signed August Gamache and Catharina Ciders Gamache of Carondelet, St. Louis County, Missouri, March 14, 1854 Receipt of $1,050 for the sale of a 25-year-old Negro slave named Jim from Mary H. Tindall to Alexander McElhinney. Document dated St. Louis County, Missouri. D01358 1854 July 12 1 5 Receipt for $1,050 signed Mary H. Tindall, July 12, 1854 1854-1856 Receipt of $800 for the sale of a 22-year-old Negro slave woman named Sarah from I. & T. Holliday to Thos Morse. Document dated Aberdeen, Mississippi. [accession number 57-0120] D01380 1854 Nov 7 1 5 Receipt for $800 signed I. Holliday and T. Holliday, Aberdeen, Mississippi, November 7, 1854 Receipt of $1,200 for the sale of a 27-year-old Negro woman named Fannie from Eliz. Hewitt (represented by Mari B. Eckford[?]) to Sarah A. Morse. Document dated Aberdeen, Mississippi. [accession number 57-0134] D01412 1856 Sept 6 1 5 Receipt of $1,200 signed Mari B. Eckford[?], Aberdeen, Mississippi, September 6, 1856 Receipt of $900 for the sale of a 27-year-old Negro slave named Bob from Benj. N. McElroy to James A.B. McElroy. [accession number 89-0020] D01371 1856 Mar 31 1 5 Receipt of $900 signed Benj. N. McElroy, March 31, 1856 Deed of manumission signed Walker D. Shumate, agent of the Missouri State Colonization Society and of St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing the following slaves: 43-year-old Negro named Philip; 40-year-old Jemima; 19-year-old Amanda; 14-year-old Jane; 9-year-old Mary; 5-year-old Elvira; and 3-year-old Eveline. Witnesses, William C. Jamison and Geo. W. Cline. Includes acknowledgment of the deed by Walker D. Shumate, recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by William J. Hammond, clerk, April 29, 1856. [gift of Dr. A.H. Conrad, St. Louis, March 20, 1952] D01340 1856 Apr 29 1 5 Deed of manumission signed Walker D. Shumate, agent of the Missouri State Colonization Society and of St. Louis County, Missouri, April 29, 1856 Notarized deed of sale of the following slaves for $13,226, sold by Bernard Kendig of New Orleans to Julius Witkowski and Henry Marks of the parish of Carroll, Louisiana: 35-year-old Negro man named Oneas; 25-year-old Negro woman named Clara; 6-year-old Negro boy named Brazil; 4-year-old Negro girl named Laffee; 23-year-old Negro man named Archie Nelson; 22-year-old Negro man named Nathew; 20-year-old Negro man named Marcus; Jackson; Thomas; Tom Brown; Lucinda; Margaret; and Crawford. Witnesses, Hugh Madden and Andrew Herr, Jr. 1856 July 2 1 5 Deed of sale of a 25-year-old slave named Luda or Ludy for $850 from James I.[or J.] Long to Morrall & Fish of Jefferson County, Arkansas. Document dated New Orleans. [gift of Mrs. M.P. Morrell, August 1938] D01212 1857 Jan 2 1 5 Deed of sale of a 25-year-old slave named Luda or Ludy for $850, January 2, 1857 Photostat copy of letter signed Wm. P. G------ [last name illegible], St. Louis, to his brother. He has arrived at St. Louis from Columbus, and has booked passage on the steamer Minnehaha to Lexington, Missouri. He has not had any trouble regarding the Negroes he is transporting through the free states. (Original document is in the McCormick Agricultural Library in Chicago). [gift of William K. Bixby, May 1, 1925] D01331 1857 Apr 1 1 5 Facsimile of a broadside advertising a $100 reward offered by John P. Waring, Washington, D.C., for the capture of a runaway slave named Eliza Coursy. Facsimile was reproduced for the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago. [gift of Mrs. Edith King, Kirkwood, Missouri, December 23, 1953] (oversize) 1857 Nov 28 AMD-9 Deed of sale of a 24-year-old slave woman named Louisa for $900 from Josiah E. Isenhour, a member of the firm of Horrell Gayle & Co. of New Orleans, agents of Champ T. Stuart of Powhatan, Arkansas, to George A. Haywood [or Hayward] of New Orleans. Witnesses, John S. Mosby and James B. Durand. Certified by E. George Wells, notary public. D01342 1858 Apr 30 1 5 Deed of sale signed Josiah E. Isenhour, a member of the firm of Horrell Gayle and Co. of New Orleans, agents of Champ T. Stuart of Powhatan, Arkansas, April 30, 1858 Document signed by Dr. E. Baily, W.W. Byrd, Jas. Freeman [or Truman], Dr. M. McClintic, B.B. Sullivan, and Jas. Jackson, members of a committee appointed by citizens of the surrounding neighborhoods. Dated Monroe City, Missouri, and addressed to Mrs. Oyler and Wilson, the document requests that anti-slavery demonstrations should be suppressed and ministers should stop preaching anti-slavery doctrines. [gift of Mrs. (word unclear) Logan Miller, Palmyra, 1918] D01373 1858 May 1 1 5 Document signed Dr. E. Baily, W.W. Byrd, Jas. Freeman [or Truman], Dr. M. McClintic, B.B. Sullivan, and Jas. Jackson, members of a committee appointed by citizens of the surrounding neighborhoods, Monroe City, Missouri, addressed to Mrs. Oyler and Wilson, May 1, 1858 Facsimile of a broadside advertising a $100 reward offered by Isaac Neff of Clay County, Missouri, for the capture of a 10-year-old runaway slave named John. [gift of Robert D. Withers, Liberty, Missouri, September 10, 1930] (oversize) 1859 Jan 31 AMD-9 Document signed Phillip Curtis (signed with his “X” mark), agreeing to hire a colored man named Henry Lucas from E.B. Kimball for one year. Witness, E.J. Walton. Document dated St. Louis. [gift of Mary Kimball von Schrenk, August 1918] D01352 1859 Feb 14 1 5 Document signed Phillip Curtis [signed with his X mark], February 14, 1859 Facsimile of a deed of emancipation signed Ulysses S. Grant of St. Louis County, Missouri, freeing a 35-year-old Negro slave named William Jones. Witnesses, J.G. McClellan and W.S. Hillyer. Includes acknowledgment of the deed by U.S. Grant, recorded in the St. Louis Circuit Court by Stephen Rice, clerk, March 29, 1859. D01364 1859 Mar 1 6 Receipt of $500 for the sale of a 48-year-old Negro named Sam from Asa Swindell to Whitaker & Burnett. Witness, B.S. Hopkins. Document dated St. Louis. D01347 1859 Dec 21 1 6 Receipt of $500 signed Asa Swindell, December 21, 1859 Manuscript poem signed L. [Lydia] Maria Child, Wayland, Massachusetts. Includes two typescript copies of poem. [gift of John H. Gundlach] D01330 1860 Apr 1 6 Manuscript poem by L. [Lydia] Maria Child, April 1860 Broadside advertising a $150 reward offered by A. Jackson Smoot, Charles County, Maryland, for the capture of a 40-year-old Negro man named Nace Dorsey. D01359 1860 July 15 1 6 Broadside advertisement, July 15, 1860 Document signed A. Serapunce, recorder of the parish of St. John the Baptist, Louisiana, certifying that there are no other mortgages in his records against Theadule Urbain Picou, Lise Picou, and Emilie Picou, free people of color, on a certain piece of property in the parish of St. John the Baptist nor on more than 60 slaves that the document lists by name and age. The document further states that Theadule Urbain Picou, Lise Picou, and Emilie Picou have granted in favor of Mrs. Hyppolite Bourgour the aforementioned land and slaves in order to guarantee payment of 18 notes, and that they have agreed to pay a life annuity to Francoise and Felicite, free Negresses, as established for them by the late Marie Louise Panis in a will taken May 16, 1849. (in French, includes translation) [gift of Doyce B. Nunis, Jr., Los Angeles, February 22, 1955] D01338 1861 Apr 25 1 6 Document signed A. Serapunce, recorder of the parish of St. John the Baptist, Louisiana, April 25, 1861 Receipt of $400 for the sale of a 30-year-old Negro slave named Laura from Nathan Cole to Mrs. Virginia Wilkerson of St. Louis, Missouri. Document further states, “Mrs. Wilkerson is to hold the said Laura and her issue for the joint benefit of said Wilkerson and of Elihu W. Brown of Jacksonville, Ills. & the said Mrs. Wilkerson shall first apply the wages of sd.[said] Laura to the reimbursement of herself for the four hundred dollars paid me & shall then hold the said Laura for four hundred & fifty dollars for account of said E.W. Brown as aforesaid & whenever the said Laura shall have earned eight hundred & fifty dollars or if the same shall be paid to the respective party the said Mrs. Wilkerson & to said Brown by Laura's sister Ellen Wells then the said Mrs. Wilkerson shall give to said Ellen a bill of sale for said Laura or set her free at the option of afsd.[aforesaid] Ellen Wells, at all times, barring death or the running away of said Laura.” Includes correspondence dated 1933 between the donor and the Missouri Historical Society. (two items) [gift of Mrs. Carrie L. Wilkerson, May 1933] D01363 1861 June 12 1 6 Receipt for $400 signed Nathan Cole, June 12, 1861 Photostat of a portion of a page from the Missouri Republican that contains an advertisement of St. Louis merchants Henry Bell & Son for jeans and linseys for Negro wear. D01213 1864 Jan 9 1 6 Oversize parchment document titled “An Ordinance Abolishing Slavery in Missouri,” signed by more than 60 members of the Missouri constitutional convention. (transferred to collection titled Missouri Secretary of State Ordinance Abolishing Slavery) A1074 1865 Jan 11 AMD-9 Missouri Secretary of State Ordinance Abolishing Slavery, January 11, 1865 Letter signed John Wilson, San Francisco, to Thos. Shackelford. Discusses a private meeting he attended in 1827 or 1828 with party leaders, both Democrats and Whigs, representing every district of Missouri, in which they considered how to abolish slavery in Missouri. Colonel Benton and Judge Barton attended the meeting. (includes partial typescript) D01336 1866 Jan 13 1 6 Letter signed John Wilson, San Francisco, to Thos. Shackelford, January 13, 1866 Photocopy of “The Story of Peter Boyd’s Life” as he told it to Mary C. (Mrs. George E.) Rix, in Keokuk, Iowa; copied by Elizabeth Irwin Elder in 1941. A native of Virginia, Peter Boyd was a former slave of Henry Clay. Boyd’s reminiscences discuss his life in Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Arkansas. He worked in gold mines, tended Henry Clay’s horses, and worked as a blacksmith. He mentions meeting General Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren. During the Civil War he was captured at Arkansas Fort, and taken to St. Louis. He then worked on steamboats, and traveled up the Missouri River to the Idaho gold mines on the steamboat Kilkarney . He was later freed, and settled in Keokuk, Iowa. (9 pages) [accession number 76-0001] D01386 1900 Mar 15 1 6 Circular titled “Immediate and Unconditional Emancipation in Missouri, 1865-1901, Thirty-Sixth Anniversary.” Circular discusses St. Louis mayor Chauncey I. Filley’s efforts to abolish slavery in Missouri, and includes a facsimile of an ordinance abolishing slavery in Missouri, dated January 11, 1865. [accession number 63-0058] D01387 1901 Jan 1 6 Circular: "Immediate and Unconditional Emancipation in Missouri, 1865-1901, Thirty-Sixth Anniversary," 1901 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], Baltimore, Maryland, to E.M. Violette [Eugene M. Violette], Kirksville Normal [School], Missouri. Shares bibliographic references with Violette regarding slavery in Missouri, and discusses his research on this topic. (In 1914, Trexler wrote a book titled Slavery in Missouri, 1804-1865 ). D01368 1913 Mar 15 1 6 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], Baltimore, Maryland, to E.M. Violette [Eugene M. Violette], Kirksville Normal [School], Missouri, March 15, 1913 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], Baltimore, Maryland, to “My Dear Mr. Violette [Eugene M. Violette].” Trexler agrees to read Violette’s manuscript, and inquires about a summer position in Missouri. D01369 1913 Mar 26 1 6 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], Baltimore, Maryland, to "My Dear Mr. Violette [Eugene M. Violette], March 26, 1913 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], Baltimore, Maryland, to "My Dear Violette [Eugene M. Violette]." Discusses slave laws and codes in Missouri. D01372 1913 Mar 31 1 6 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], Baltimore, Maryland, to My Dear Violette, March 31, 1913 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, to Judge W.B. Douglas [Walter B. Douglas], St. Louis, Missouri. Encloses a copy of a paper he wrote titled "Slavery in Colonial Missouri." (Walter B. Douglas was a historian and former president of the Missouri Historical Society). (typescript paper contains 13 pages) D01209 1915 Jan 9 1 6 Letter signed H.A. Trexler [Harrison Anthony Trexler], University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, to Judge W.B. Douglas [Walter B. Douglas], St. Louis, Missouri, January 9, 1915 Typescript document compiled by Jas. C. Espy regarding the history of a gavel presented by Theodore H. Koelling to the Missouri Historical Society. This gavel had been used by St. Louis mayor Chauncey Ives Filley on October 17, 1863, when he presided over a mass meeting at the St. Louis Courthouse denouncing the ordinance restricting the freedom of slaves. (oversize) [circa 1923-1940] AMD-9 Typescript paper with pencil corrections titled "The Legal Aspects of Slavery in Missouri" by Emil Oberholzer, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the faculty of political science, Columbia University. (71 pages) Published in the Bulletin of the Missouri Historical Society , Vol. VI, Nos. 2, 3, and 4 (January, April, and July 1950). D01157 1949 June 1 7