date(s):
1846-1946
type(s):
Documentary Artifacts; Collection
A1330 Rumbold, Charlotte Papers Inventory of Charlotte Rumbold Papers A1330 EAD by Sarah Wohaska using ArchivesSpace Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center 2016 225 S. Skinker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63105 archives@mohistory.org URL: This finding aid was produced using ArchivesSpace on 2018-09-27 06:29:28 -0500 . English Describing Archives: A Content Standard English Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center Charlotte Rumbold Papers Rumbold, Caroline, 1877-1957 Rumbold, Charlotte, 1869-1960 Baldwin, Roger N. (Roger Nash), 1884-1981 Bulkley, Mary E. Rumbold, Frank Swope, Horace A1330 1.0 Cubic Feet (2 boxes) 1846-1946 Some German, French, and Japanese Processing Information Processed by Jamie Schmidt, March 2008. Donor Information Collection was donated by Charlotte Rumbold in January 1954. Biographical Sketch Dr. Thomas F. Rumbold, whose previous wife had died, leaving him two small children, Mildred and Frank, married Charlotte E. Lederberger. She and her husband lived in St. Louis, where they raised his children and their four daughters: Charlotte, Estella, May, and Caroline. A foster child, Oliver Will Phillips, was also raised by the family. Dr. Rumbold was an internationally known medical specialist of the ear, nose and throat; he also invented a splint for gun-shot fractures of the leg and thigh, and spray procedures treating the nasal passages and throat. Charlotte Rumbold was a social reformer who worked in St. Louis for the Open Air Playground Committee in 1902, spent nine years as playgrounds supervisor for the city starting in 1906, and compiled a descriptive report on terrible housing conditions for the city's Civic League in 1908. She also organized a large, successful Pageant and Masque in Forest Park in 1913 to celebrate the city’s 150th anniversary. A suffragist and popular speaker, her motto was, "If we play together, we will work together." In 1914, the St. Louis Globe-Democrat named her the "best-known young woman in St. Louis." The following year, when she asked for a raise from St. Louis as New York was recruiting her for a $4,000-per-year position, despite public outrage, the city's Board of Aldermen voted against her raise given that "she is not a voter." She resigned and moved to Cleveland, Ohio, to work for the Chamber of Commerce as secretary of the city planning committee, where she studied Cleveland's housing situation and made recommendations. She was responsible for Cleveland's first group housing in 1917, and she continued her work to eliminate slums and improve housing conditions and public spaces. She died at age 90 in Cleveland. Caroline Rumbold (1877-1957), eight years younger than Charlotte, received her bachelor's degree at Smith College in 1901, a master's degree at Washington University (St. Louis) in 1903, and a Ph.D. in plant pathology at Washington University in 1911. She worked for the United States Department of Agriculture in various positions from 1903 as a scientific aid through 1942, when she retired from her position as associate pathologist. She also taught botany at the University of Missouri. In 1928 she embarked on a world tour, which she documented in many letters to her siblings and in three diaries. Scope and Contents The Charlotte Rumbold Papers Series comprises mostly correspondence to and from family members and colleagues from 1918 to 1937. The papers are arranged chronologically and include four letters from Roger Nash Baldwin, a prominent social activist who helped form the American Civil Liberties Union. The Caroline Rumbold Papers Series includes mostly correspondence to and from family members from 1918 to 1929. In the correspondence, their brother Frank Meeker Rumbold referred to his sister Charlotte as "Budge," and Caroline as "Toots" and "Tom." The Engelmann Family Papers Series includes typed translatations (from German) of letters of Lieutenant Adolph Engelmann to his parents during the Mexican War, 1846-1847. Charlotte Rumbold, a seventh-generation members of the Engelmann family, owned these family papers. The papers are arranged chronologically. The General Correspondence Series comprises letters from Charlotte's brother, Frank Rumbold, to his wife, along with several letters from her friend, writer Mary E. Buckley to her friend, Horace Swope. The Charlotte Rumbold Speeches Series includes her speeches on street life and housing conditions. The Caroline Rumbold Travel Diaries Series includes three diaries from her trip around the world in 1928 and 1929. Caroline Rumbold's travel diaries and her letters to siblings from her world tour are similar in content. The Miscellaneous Series includes Caroline Rumbold's scrapbook and Charlotte Rumbold's "Report of the Housing Committee of The Civic League of St. Louis." Arrangement The collection is arranged in the following seven series: the Charlotte Rumbold Papers Series , Caroline Rumbold Papers Series , Engelmann Family Papers Series , General Correspondence Series , Charlotte Rumbold Speeches Series , Caroline Rumbold Travel Diaries Series , and Miscellaneous Series . The contents within each series are arranged chronologically. Conditions Governing Access The collection is open for research use. Conditions Governing Use For permission to publish, quote from, or reproduce material from this collection, please contact the Archives Reference Desk at archives@mohistory.org . Copyright restrictions may apply. The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of copyright. Physical and Technical Requirements There are no physical or technical restrictions. Preferred Citation Charlotte Rumbold Papers, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis. Africa -- Description and travel Asia -- Description and travel Australia -- Description and travel China -- Description and travel City planning -- United States Engelmann family -- Genealogy Europe -- Description and travel France -- Description and travel Germany -- Description and travel Housing, Cooperative -- New York (State) -- New York Housing -- Missouri -- Saint Louis Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland Housing policy -- United States India -- Description and travel Japan -- Description and travel Mexico -- Description and travel New Zealand -- Description and travel Ocean travel Soldiers -- United States -- Correspondence South Africa -- Description and travel Women social reformers -- United States World War, 1914-1918 Charlotte Rumbold Papers Series Western Union telegram from Frank Rumbold to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio, regarding his arrival in Cleveland. 1918 May 12 1 1 Letter signed Frank Rumbold, The Waldorf Astoria [New York], to Charlotte “Budge” Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Bids her good-bye. 1918 May 18 1 1 Postcard signed Col. Frank Rumbold, American Red Cross “Soldier's Mail,” to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Explains that his ship has arrived safely. [1918 late May?] 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, American Y.M.C.A., to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Writes that travel to England and France was pleasant thus far and that future travel plans are uncertain. 1918 June 24 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, American Y.M.C.A., to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Explains his change of address. 1918 June 27 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Writes that he is anxious to join the infantry of his division on the front line. 1918 July 17 1 1 Letter signed Frank, The Buckingham, St. Louis, to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains that he received orders to report to Washington, D.C., for duty on General Staff (War Plans Division) and will be on duty for at least six months. 1918 July 18 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains that her letters to him are not censored, and that their cousin in the Red Cross, Helen Day, visited him. 1918 July 23 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, France, to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold], Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses thoughts about war, capturing Germans. “Let's fight to a finish—no matter how long it takes or what it costs.” 1918 July 25 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, France, to Charlotte “Budge” Rumbold. Expresses thoughts about the mentality of soldiers and conditions in France during war. 1918 Aug 8 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, France, to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Discusses war conditions. “The Americans . . . won't be outdone—they will fight like devils.” 1918 Aug 11 1 1 Letter signed Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, to Allan Orrick. Rumbold scolds him for not writing her after she wrote him ten times. [1918?] Aug 14 1 1 Letter from W.R. Castle, director of the American Red Cross National Headquarters, Washington, D.C., to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Explains that her letter to Edward T. Devine has been received and will be forwarded to his address in Paris. 1918 Aug 22 1 1 Postcard signed Helen Day, American Red Cross, France, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses family news and encourages Charlotte to come to France, now that the “brother/sister clause has been eliminated.” 1918 Sept 8 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, France, to Charlotte “Budge” Rumbold. Discusses uncertainty in war. Warns her not to let anyone discuss compromise during war. “Let's fight it out to a definite conclusion.” 1918 Sept 11 1 1 Letter signed Horace Swope, Splendide Hotel, Marseille, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses Red Cross's priorities and how France has changed during the war. Mentions seeing Charlotte's cousin Helen Day. Encloses French and English newspaper clippings regarding his work; one clipping includes Swope’s photograph. [1918] Sept 14 1 1 Letter signed [signature illegible], Paris, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Sends greetings and mentions Horace Swope's whereabouts. 1918 Sept 15 1 1 Letter signed Horace Swope, Marseille, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses the French countryside, French hospital visits, observations of French mentality during the war. Encloses a Red Cross bulletin (dated September 14, 1918) to give Charlotte an idea about his job responsibilities as manager of the Southern Zone at Marseille. [1918] Sept 19 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains he is disappointed to be in a hospital, “too badly run down for them to let me go into this fight.” Dr. (Maj.) Sidney Schwab sends regards. 1918 Oct 3 1 1 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold to “Sister” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains he is still in hospital; expresses his thoughts about the German army. 1918 Oct 10 1 1 Letter signed Horace Swope to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses life in France and the possibility of peace. Asks her to share his letters with Miss Bulkley. French newspaper clipping from “Le Radical” enclosed. (OVERSIZE) [1918] Oct 14 OS: Pollock-R Letter signed Helen J. Day, “Behind the Great American Offensive, Evacuation Hospitals 6 & 7,” [France], to “Dear Cousin Charlotte” [Rumbold], Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses her experiences with the Red Cross in Paris in detail: “khaki- colored tents in a vast sea of mud.” 1918 Oct 17 1 2 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold], Cleveland, Ohio. Explains he is feeling strong and is to go back for assignment to duty. Newspaper clipping of Gilbert Frankau's poem, “The Beasts in Gray.” 1918 Nov 4 1 2 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, American Y.M.C.A., to Charlotte “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains he is awaiting assignment to duty and hopes to be back in the Militia Bureau. 1918 Nov 10 1 2 Letter signed Rubin Schwah[?] to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Tells her she will likely not be considered a manager of “the negro village” because she is a woman. 1918 Dec 9 1 2 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, American Y.M.C.A., “near Bordeaux,” France, to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains that he is going home and should be expected in January. Expresses concerns about war. 1918 Dec 9 1 2 Letter signed Col. Frank Rumbold, American Y.M.C.A., to “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Expresses concerns about his regiment and war. “Crush them and make every one of them feel they are looked down upon for generations is what we want.” 1918 Dec 11 1 2 Letter signed Roger N. Baldwin, “Essex County Jail, Newark,” to Charlotte Rumbold. Discussion of life in prison. 1918 Dec 28 1 2 Letter signed Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio, to Allen Orrick. Sends greetings and writes that she is proud of him for earning his majority. 1919 Jan 4 1 2 Postcard of Paris signed Horace Swope to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Mentions interesting time in Paris, how he hasn't heard from Charlotte in so long. 1919 Jan 8 1 2 Postcard of Bordeaux signed “M.G.I.” Notes a pending trip to Bordeaux. 1919 Jan 10 1 2 Postcard of Paris signed Horace Swope to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. 1919 Jan 23 1 2 Letter signed Horace Swope, Hotel Lutetia, Paris, to Charlotte Rumbold. Tells her about optimism in France regarding the Peace Conference. Discusses his travels in Europe and his future with the Red Cross. [1919?] Feb 16 1 2 Letter signed Allen C. Orrick to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Writes that his army experiences have been “a great disappointment” and explains his eagerness to “get back to civil life.” 1919 Feb 20 1 2 Letter signed Kate Vassaret, The War Work Council, Y.M.C.A., New York City, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses her recent appointment as acting director of the publicity department “with this most Christian organization.” [1919?] Mar 19 1 2 Postcard signed HMS [Horace Swope], to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses his travel plans to London. 1919 Mar 21 1 3 Letter signed Roger N. Baldwin, “The Can, Newark” to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses life in jail and socialist thought, in a joking, sarcastic nature. [1919] Mar 27 1 3 Postcard signed HMS [Horace Swope] of Chartres, La Rue du Bourg, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses Easter Sunday. [1919 Apr?] 1 3 Note card signed Leo Loeb, 719 Westgate Ave., St. Louis, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Writes that he has received back his manuscript and would be glad to send it to her. [1919 Apr?] 1 3 Note card signed Leo Loeb, 719 Westgate Ave., St. Louis, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Writes that he is sending her his manuscript. 1919 Apr 7 1 3 Letter signed Horace Swope, La Regence Cafe Restaurant, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses his visits to Germany, London, Belgium, and Holland. Tells her he decided to go back to his job. Two French newspaper clippings, one a war cartoon, enclosed. [1919?] Apr 9 1 3 Letter signed Horace Swope, Paris, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses his travel in Europe and America's mentality. “Sometimes it seems to me that we are a mad nation.” [1919?] Apr 27 1 3 Letter signed Horace Swope, Hotel du Palais, Biarritz, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses his experience in the American Red Cross, compared to business. “Business has never gripped me the way the A.R.C. has.” 1919 May 13 1 3 Note card signed Leo Loeb, 719 Westgate Ave., St. Louis, Missouri, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Says he feels guilty in having sent her his manuscript since she is so busy. 1919 May 30 1 3 Postcard signed Leo Loeb to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Tells her he will arrive next Saturday. 1919 June 17 1 3 Letter signed Leo Loeb, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, to “Miss Rumbold” [Charlotte Rumbold]. He thanks her for spending so much time going over his manuscript. He looks forward to her comments. 1919 June 29 1 3 Postcard of Woods Hole, Massachusetts, signed Leo Loeb to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Tells her to take her time with his manuscript. 1919 [July?] 1 3 Letter signed Horace Swope, Baltic, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses travel experiences. 1919 July 3 1 3 Letter signed Leo Loeb, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, to “Miss Rumbold” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Writes he is grateful for her suggestions regarding his manuscript. 1919 July 20 1 3 Letter signed “Frankel,” Frankel & Frankel Lawyers, Cleveland, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Writes that advertisement enclosed appeared in “The Jewish Independent.” Enclosed advertisement for Max Beallo Sausage. 1919 July 24 1 4 Letter signed “RNB” [Roger N. Baldwin], to “my friends,” Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses his life after prison, “one of the most revealing and dramatic experiences of my life.” 1919 July 31 1 4 Letter signed Roger N. Baldwin to Charlotte Rumbold. Explains his upcoming marriage to Madeleine Doty. [1919] Aug 1 1 4 Letter signed Horace Swope, en route Paris, to Charlotte Rumbold. Tells Charlotte to send his love to Miss [Mary] Bulkley, discusses his skill at French and his travel observations. [1919?] Sept 28 1 4 Letter signed Horace Swope, Paris, to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Discusses life at sea on a troop ship. Says he saw Roger Baldwin with Madeleine Doty. French newspaper clipping about President Wilson, dated October 13, no year. (clipping filed in OVERSIZE ) [1919 October?] OS: Pollock-R Letter signed Horace Swope, Brasserie de Strasbourg, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discussion of his travels and observations abroad. [1919?] Oct 22 1 4 Letter signed Horace Swope, Paris, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses war conditions and his routine. [1919?] Dec 12 1 4 Letter signed “M.E.B.” [Mary E. Bulkley], Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, England, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses travel experiences abroad. 1920 June 14 1 4 Letter signed “M.E.B.” [Mary E. Bulkley], England, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses travel experiences abroad. 1920 July 25 1 4 Letter signed “MB” [Mary E. Bulkley], London, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses travel observations. 1920 Aug 8 1 4 Letter signed Horace Swope, American Red Cross, to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses attitudes concerning war. “. . . why pretend there's such a thing as a bloodless revolution?” [1920?] Dec 2 1 5 Typed letter signed Irene Odinsova, Camp Fenimore, New York, to “Miss Rumbold” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Discusses how she wound up working and living at Camp Fenimore for a while, and her future plans to register at Columbia. 1925 Aug 26 1 5 Postcard of the Grand Canyon signed Horace [Horace Swope] to “Miss C. Rumbold” [Charlotte Rumbold], Cleveland, Ohio. 1928 Sept 6 1 5 Typescript document titled “How the Wickersham Commission would have written Lincoln's Gettysburg address.” Of a joking, sarcastic nature. [1929?] 1 5 Letter signed Ray Miller, Cleveland mayor, to “Miss Rumbold” [Charlotte Rumbold], Cleveland, Ohio. Thanks Charlotte for her efforts in a joint attempt to “conduct the government of the City of Cleveland.” 1932 Dec 23 1 5 Unsigned letter, Charlotte Rumbold, to Col. Leonard Ayers. Writes that the world needs “the clarification of the metaphysics of the Hegelian dialectic.” 1937 1 5 Typescript document names a series of pamphlets regarding St. Louis being bound in a book form with Charlotte Rumbold and Dwight Davis named in conjunction with the city's Parks, Playgrounds, and Recreation. No Date 1 5 Unsigned letter to Charlotte Rumbold. Tells her the program at the John Huntington School is too old to be considered. Encloses 1920 pamphlet on The John Huntington Polytechnic Institute, evening classes opening in October. No Date 1 5 Playbill: The Play House presenting “The Mistress of the Inn” by Goldoni from December 17-19. No Date 1 5 Unsigned letter of Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio, to unknown. Writes that she is sending her manuscript. Enclosed are several notes outlining chapters on “The Economics of Psychical Goods.” No Date 1 5 Unsigned postcard. Discussion of Frank's regiment and injury. No Date 1 5 Postcard of “Orange, La Theatre romain,” signed Horace Swope to Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio. Expresses that he is busy and expects to stay for at least a year. No Date 1 5 Postcard of Egyptian statue in the Louvre Museum. No Date 1 5 Postcard of amphitheatre, “Palais Gallien.” No Date 1 5 Postcard of Greek Statue, Hera, in the Louvre Museum. No Date 1 5 Postcard of Marseilles with penciled notes about the landscape. No Date 1 5 7-page pamphlet about the Gallien Place, an amphitheater in Bordeaux. No Date 1 5 Letter signed Horace Swope to Charlotte Rumbold. Asks Charlotte to visit London and jokes about his dream about her. No Date 1 5 Letter signed Horace Swope to Charlotte Rumbold. Discusses their acquaintances, his travels, and his justification for turning down a full-time Red Cross job. Warns Charlotte not to read his letter in her office. No Date 1 5 Caroline Rumbold Papers Series Letter signed Frank Rumbold, American Y.M.C.A., to “My dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Tells her and Charlotte not to come to Europe but to stay home. He expects to be back the following month. 1918 Dec 9 1 6 The Blue Funnel Line schedule of sailings between United Kingdom and the Far East. 1928 Jan 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes that she is sending Charlotte her jewelry and life insurance policies and explains when payments are due. Says she has received vaccinations and bought travel outfits. 1928 Jan 29 1 6 Letter signed Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes that she is sending Charlotte her insurance policies, will, diplomas. Explains that it will be fine if Charlotte comes to New York when Caroline leaves [the country on her world tour]. 1928 Feb 7 1 6 Notes about natural environment. 1928 Feb 19 1 6 Letter signed Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn], New York, to “Toots” [Caroline Rumbold]. Writes that Caroline must let her buy some “of the stuff” [souvenirs]. [1928] Mar 20 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], United States Lines, “At Sea,” to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes about her freedom to observe while traveling and regret that Charlotte did not join her. Explains that her table companions are “working people” and American and the passengers and crew are divided between Germans and Americans. [1928] Mar 28 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], United States Lines, “At Sea,” to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes of travel observations, that “alertness” is characteristic of Americans. Explains that she will send Estelle her accident insurance policy. [1928] Mar 30 1 6 Letter signed Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn], New York, to “Kaggy.” Writes about Caroline's travel plans. [1928] Mar 31 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Hotel Columbus, Bremen, to “Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Writes of travel observations, companions, and plans. Explains that half of her “letter of credit” was stolen, which worries her because “the family may have to stake me for a month.” 1928 Apr 1 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Munich, Germany, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes that she was glad to hear that the loss of one half of her letter of credit would not mean much trouble. Describes change in Munich since her last visit and compares Germans to Americans. 1928 Apr 4 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “Munchen,” Germany, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of her travel companion, Marie Heck. Tells Charlotte to keep the letters Caroline sends the family. Writes of the temperament of Botanist and Professor “Luberf.” Enclosed a postcard of the university in Munich. 1928 Apr 11 1 6 Western Union telegram signed Charlotte [Rumbold], Cleveland, to Caroline Rumbold, Hamburg, Germany. Writes that she is in good “health, weather, company, luck.” [1928] Apr 14 1 6 Index card details Caroline Rumbold's travel plans. [1928] Apr 17 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Toledo , to Frank [Rumbold]. Writes of her impressions of poverty and illness in Munich, Germany. 1928 Apr 21 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Toledo , to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes of how her glimpses of cities are melancholy and make her feel ignorant of life and interests behind activity. Encloses a letter from Professor Ernst Munch, which she asks Estelle to keep for her due to its jovial quality. [Letter is not in papers.] 1928 Apr 21 1 6 Notice to Charlotte Rumbold, Mildred Wilkinson and Col. Frank M. Rumbold that Caroline received a cable that morning. 1928 Apr 21 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], S.S. Toledo , to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of daily travel observations, how she prefers North German sea ports and the countryside in Germany. Writes of seeing Rembrandts in Amsterdam museum. [1928] Apr 22 1 6 “Hamburg-Amerika Line Bordspiele Deck Sports” booklet detailing sports and games schedules in German and English. 1928 May 1 6 Unsigned letter [Caroline Rumbold], Toledo , “Off the West African Coast,” to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of her inclination to spend more time in South Africa, her health, her plans to wire her sister. “It is warm, the sea is like oil.” [1928] May 3 1 6 Typed letter signed secretary to Mr. Kohn [Caroline's brother-in-law], New York, to General Frank M. Rumbold, Mildred Wilkinson, and Charlotte Rumbold. Writes that Mrs. [Estelle] Kohn asked her to send a copy of a cable received that morning by Caroline Rumbold: “Good answer via Capetown Radio.” Writes that [Estelle] Kohn asked her to explain that “good” means that Caroline is having a good time. 1928 May 7 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Toledo , to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of her travel observations at sea, passing the time by playing games and adding whiskey to her water since the water tastes bad. “The ocean is quite empty.” [1928] May 10 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Toledo , to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Writes of travel observations; compares the dress and drink of English women and Germans to herself. Writes of her travel companions. Encloses photograph of costume party as she passed the equator. 1928 May 10 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Toledo , to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of topography in West Africa. “Sand, sand, sand.” Discusses rumors of race relations and her plan to reach Capetown. 1928 May 14 1 6 Handwritten cabled note signed Charlotte [Rumbold], Cleveland, to [Caroline] Rumbold, Durban, Africa. “Cheers. Love, Charlotte.” [1928] May 17 1 6 Letter signed “C” [Caroline Rumbold], Capetown, South Africa, to “Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Writes of travel observations and African soil and climate. “I have the feeling of having been brought to another world.” Writes of German-American relations. 1928 May 19 1 6 Typed letter of Mr. Kohn's secretary, New York, to Charlotte Rumbold, Mildred R. Wilkinson and Gen. Frank M. Rumbold. Writes that [Estelle] Kohn asked her to send a copy of Caroline Rumbold's radiogram: “Joy Johannesburg May 30.” Writes that “joy” means grand time and that Mrs. Kohn cabled Miss [Caroline] Rumbold. 1928 May 21 1 6 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “Durban, S.A. [South Africa],” to “Family.” Writes that she left the S.S. Toledo for good that morning. Writes of travel observations, a trip by railroad “into the interior.” Writes of South Africans going to Europe when they become ill. “I believe my country is a kinder land to live in.” 1928 May 21 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “Durban, S.A. [South Africa],” to “Family.” Writes of travel plans and of her weight gain. 1928 May 25 1 7 Letter signed Hannah Blumenthal, Interlaken, to Caroline [Rumbold], Bombay, India. Writes of the weather and scenery. Apologizes that her sister cannot join Caroline on her trips. 1928 May 27 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “Durban, S.A. [South Africa],” to “Family.” Writes about the presence of American cars, trucks, and tractors. Notes her visits to burials and a straw hut. “One can tell where the white man's farm begins…One cannot help but be impressed by the situation of the white man, and his endurance to keep supremacy.” 1928 May 31 1 7 Essay titled “Impressions of South Africa” [by Caroline Rumbold]. Writes about the landscape, race relations, American influence, and daily life. “Women must carry their household water uphill for miles.” Note to “C.R.” [Charlotte Rumbold] at bottom of essay: “See if this can be used in a newspaper.” [circa 1928 June] 1 7 Letter signed [illegible signature], Munich, to Caroline [Rumbold]. Writes that Caroline must have gathered many impressions and standpoints on her travels, and that her books are being read. [1928] June 1 1 7 Letter signed Marie Heck, Munchen, to Caroline Rumbold, Bombay, India. Thanks Caroline for spending time with her in Germany and writing to her from the S.S. Toledo . (Written in German. Includes translation.) 1928 June 2 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Johannesburg, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Explains that she changed her itinerary and will now take a British mail boat, Karapara to eastern coast ports. She will be in Bombay July 21. 1928 June 2 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Polley's Hotel, to “Family.” Writes of the lack of sewage systems, seeing wild game, her fondness of South African landscapes. 1928 June 11 1 7 Two note cards signed Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn], New York. States that her husband's secretary forgot to mention that Caroline's cable came from Durban on May 21 and that she cabled Durban. Explains future plans to cable Caroline about mail. [1928] June 13 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Johannesburg, S.A. [South Africa], to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of African landscapes and plans to consider purchasing an elephant tusk for Estelle. Explains that Charlotte was the first one to write and say she had received a letter from Caroline, and that she may need more money once she reaches Australia. 1928 June 15 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Johannesburg, S.A. [South Africa], to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Discusses travel experiences and her decision not to buy an elephant tusk for Estelle because it was too small and expensive. 1928 June 19 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Victoria Falls Hotel, to “C” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Writes of Victoria Falls, that lions have been “exterminated,” and her impressions of “natives.” [circa 1928 June 26] 1 7 Unsigned letter [from Caroline Rumbold], Victoria Falls, Southern Rhodesia, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Red ink notes that letter was postmarked June 26-28 [1928]. Writes of spending money too quickly, compares Victoria Falls to Niagara, and explains that monkeys and baboons live undisturbed by man. (postmarked 1928 June 26) 1928 June 26 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], The Grand Hotel, Bulawayo, Rhodesia, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes about Rhodesian climate and landscape. “I found the rocks covered with lichens—brilliant red, green-yellow and silvery gray.” 1928 June 28 1 7 Letter signed Frank [Rumbold], Washington, D.C., to “Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Writes that he is sure the $200 he sent her will come in handy. Discusses [their sister] May's decision not to apply for a divorce, which “Budge” [Charlotte Rumbold] deems a mistake. Advises Caroline to call the National Bank of India for mail. 1928 June 28 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “Johannesburg, S.A. [South Africa],” to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Writes of travel experiences, the beauty of Victoria Falls, the cold in Johannesburg. “It is so cold the natives do not want to dance.” [1928?] June 30 1 7 Memorandum of the American Express Company, Inc., Bombay, noting amount received from Central Bank. 1928 [circa July] 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], British India Steam Navigation Co., Ld., to Frank [Rumbold]. Discusses enjoying her travels and requests that the Equitable Trust Co. send her $500 in bankers notes of ten and twenty dollars at the bank in Perth, W. Australia. 1928 July 5 1 7 Typed radiogram explains that cable from Caroline Rumbold was received by Charlotte Rumbold, Colonel Rumbold, Mrs. Houston, and Mrs. Wilkinson. Cable states, “Joy Bombay July Twenty.” 1928 July 5 1 7 Typed letter signed [signature illegible], National Bank of India Limited, to Caroline Rumbold, c/o The Central Bank of India Ltd., Bombay. Writes that Caroline's mail is being forwarded to The Central Bank of India. Explains that the bank has received instructions to make a payment to Caroline once she calls and produces proof of identification. 1928 July 7 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], S.S. Karapara , to “Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Writes about an Australian man who helped her make purchases. Writes of buying a small ivory elephant's tusk from East Africa for Estelle, which she will ship to her in New York. [1928] July 9 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], S.S. Karapara , to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes of elephant's tusk she purchased for Estelle and her plans to sail for India. 1928 July 11 1 7 Letter signed Frank [Rumbold], to “My dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Writes about Budge's [Charlotte Rumbold] suggestion to join Caroline in China. Explains that he is sending her money and recommends people for her to look up in Asia. Notes political hypocrisy in United States. Writes of [sister] May's likely divorce. 1928 July 12 1 7 Typed letter signed [signature illegible] to Caroline Rumbold, c/o Central Bank of India. Explains money is held for her. 1928 July 14 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], S.S. Karapara , “Equator,” to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes about landscape, wildlife, the presence of leprosy and her travel experiences in the Seychelles Islands. [1928] July 16 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Bombay, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes that she is settled in the Taj Mahal Hotel in Bombay after rough travels at sea. Writes about receiving letters and money. Contemplates paying for a servant. 1928 July 22 1 7 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Bombay, to “Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Writes of receiving money, a book and magazines from family. Gives details about her finances. Discusses race relations in South Africa. 1928 July 23 1 7 Typed letter signed by Mr. Kohn's secretary to Mrs. [Mildred] Wilkinson, Miss Charlotte Rumbold, and General Frank M. Rumbold. Notes that a cable stating “Bombay Good” from Caroline Rumbold reached Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. (postmarked 1928 July 23) 1928 July 23 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Bombay, to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Writes of her hotel and engaging a servant for her trip across India. “I am among a people whose whole mode of life differs from ours . . . . you are among a great many browned skinned people.” 1928 July 24 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Bombay, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes about travel plans and thanks Charlotte for letters and magazines. Mentions railroad strikes in India, which may abridge her stay. [1928] July 24 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “New Hotel, Jaipur,” to Estelle [Rumbold- Kohn]. Writes of animal life in the streets, people, the soil and climate. “It is wonderful to see how the dyeing, wearing and shearing are done.” [1928] July 27 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], The Great Eastern Hotel Ld., Calcutta, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Discusses efforts to cable and her preference of Africa to India. Writes about “idle people” and seeing a goat sacrificed at a Hindu temple. 1928 Aug 2 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], The Great Eastern Hotel Ld., Calcutta, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Describes insides of Hindu temples as “low and vile”; the Taj Mahal as “wonderful.” 1928 Aug 2 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], The Great Eastern Hotel Ld., Calcutta, to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Discusses her birthday in Jaipur, “one of the happiest days in India,” and the informality of Indian banks, which offer her tea. 1928 Aug 2 1 8 Letter signed [signature illegible]. Notes travel plans. [1928?] Aug 4 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Rangoon, Burma, to “Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Expresses thanks for money sent and anger over her bills sent to Frank. 1928 Aug 6 1 8 Letter signed Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn], New York, to “Dearest Toots” [Caroline Rumbold], Australia. Expresses delight at elephant's tusk sent from Caroline. “You better make Africa sound wonderful.” 1928 Aug 8 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Rangoon, Burma, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of not caring for the south of India, catching a cold, looking to buy a jade necklace. 1928 Aug 8 1 8 Letter signed [Robert Kohn], New York City, to Caroline [Rumbold], Australia. Expresses interest in Caroline's travel destinations and travel photographs; asks her to send winter weather his way, draws cartoon of stringy man in margin. 1928 Aug 9 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Rangoon, to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Expresses preference of Burma to India. Describes her car getting stuck in the mud and an elephant pulling it out. Explains that Europeans are required to go barefoot in temples. “I never would walk barefoot in any of them.” 1928 Aug 9 1 8 Unsigned note card [from Caroline Rumbold], 40 West 59th Street, New York. Expresses that she received money and is well. 1928 Aug 9 1 8 Letter signed Frank [Rumbold] to “My Dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Discusses sending her money. Asks her to cable regarding financial affairs. 1928 Aug 11 1 8 Letter signed Charlotte [Rumbold], The Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, to Caroline [Rumbold]. Explains that Caroline is causing the family “a lot of anxiety” over whether she received money Frank sent her and to not send a cable. “Please Don't.” [1928] Aug 13 1 8 Note [from Charlotte Rumbold?] stating that Kodak films from Johannesburg were received and sent to be developed. [1928] Aug 13 1 8 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], S.S. Edavana , to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes that she is traveling from Penang to Singapore in the rain, “within a degree of the equator” and that she is the only woman on board. “This ship carried live chickens, ducks and sheep, which are slaughtered on board and eaten at once.” 1928 Aug 14 1 8 Typed telegram from Robert [Kohn?] to Colonel Frank M. Rumbold, Washington, D.C. Explains that cable from Caroline says money was received. 1928 Aug 14 1 8 Typed letter signed secretary to Robert Kohn [M. Schurmann?], New York City, to Mrs. [Mildred] Wilkinson, Charlotte Rumbold, and Colonel Frank M. Rumbold. Explains that Caroline sent a cable that she received money in Bombay and Penang. 1928 Aug 14 1 8 Letter signed Frank [Rumbold] to “My Dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Expresses pleasure at having just received notice that Caroline had received money in Bombay and Rangoon. “I feel greatly relieved now I feel you are not pinched for money.” 1928 Aug 14 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], The Europe Hotel, Singapore, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes that a rat had been stealing her handkerchiefs on board while she had a cold and that her cabin was invaded by ants twice. Explains that she finds that Chinese and “Melays” “very intelligent after the Indians.” Repeats a conversation she had with a doctor from India about Hindu life. 1928 Aug 14 1 9 Letter signed Charlotte [Rumbold], Cleveland, Ohio, to [Caroline Rumbold]. Expresses delight at seeing Caroline's cable about receiving money. Writes she developed Caroline's film. Discusses family news. [1928] Aug 18 1 9 Letter unsigned [from Caroline Rumbold], Hotel des Indes, Batavia, to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Writes of her preference for Melays and Chinese to Indians. “They are much more self-reliant, cleaner and honester.” Describes her sitting room and plans to see Australia. 1928 Aug 18 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Hotel des Indes, Batavia, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes of her realization that she had best telegraph that the money from Frank had been received. Discusses future travel plans. Explains she takes quinine every night. Writes of Dutch colonies and lack of freedom, “mixed blood” on the island. 1928 Aug 20 1 9 Unsigned note explaining that films from Johnannesburg and book and letters from Bombay had been received. [1928] Aug 25 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “At Sea,” to “Dear Family.” Discusses travel plans. “I have been told some blood curling talks of how the Australians treat one another.” Writes that the Australians on board watch her closely when she converses with an Italian-American man on board; “he really is a Dago.” 1928 Aug 25 1 9 Letter signed Charlotte [Rumbold], The Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, to [Caroline Rumbold]. Asks what is worrying Caroline about money if she only spent $1600. “Why don't you spend more?” [1928] Aug 25 1 9 Notes about travel plans on stationery of the Palace Hotel, Perth. 192[8] Sept 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], West Australian Steam Navigation Company Limited, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Explains that borrowed opera glasses were stolen. “By rare good fortune I met the superintendent of the aborigines . . . I wish my voyage were over as I fear the bed bugs will get into my luggage.” 1928 Sept 1 1 9 Typed letter signed by secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Mrs. [Mildred] Wilkinson, and Gen. Frank M. Rumbold. Explains that a radiogram was received from Caroline that states “mail to Bank Melbourne.” 1928 Sept 6 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Hotel Metropole, Perth, W.A. [West Australia], to “Dear Family.” “I have dropped into primitive life here.” Discusses the many bars in the frontier town. Tells family to send mail to Sydney instead of Melbourne, despite her recent cable. “People shoot up each other occasionally. It is the 'Wild West.'” 1928 Sept 7 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Hotel, Perth, to “Dear Family.” Discusses her plans to see the Governor's House, which she later writes was delightful. Says she has not received $800 yet. 1928 Sept 9 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Hotel, Perth, to Mildred [Wilkinson]. Explains she finds the forest in Perth interesting. Discusses future travel plans. 1928 Sept 15 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Palace Hotel, Kalgoorlie, W.A. [West Australia], to “Dear Family.” Describes the western coast's flat sands and wildlife, travel observations. Explains that the Department of Forestry of West Australia paid for her railroad fare for 2,000 miles. “I have seen no forest any place or of any description which has not been burned.” States she needs no more money. 1928 Sept 18 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Melbourne, to “Dear Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Discusses travel plans. “It did not occur to me that I must cable you about the money.” 1928 Sept 25 1 9 Typed letter signed by secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Mrs. Mildred Wilkinson, and Gen. Frank M. Rumbold. Notes that Caroline Rumbold cabled that she is in Melbourne and received their mail and money. 1928 Sept 26 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold] to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Discusses travel observations such as sheep dogs and future plans to visit Sidney. 1928 Sept 26 1 9 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Melbourne, to “Dear Family.” Writes that she enjoyed West Australia and will see New Zealand. Explains that she had to forgo a trip to Tasmania due to a shipping strike. Writes that Australia “tried to ape England.” 1928 Oct 2 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Hotel Sydney, to Estelle [Rumbold-Kohn]. Writes that she received mail at the bank. Discusses future travel plans to New Zealand and Manila. Explains that she does not care for East Australia due to a civilian lack of pride. 1928 Oct 5 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Hotel Sydney, to Charlotte [Rumbold]. Writes of receiving money and gives directions to Charlotte regarding her film. Discusses future travel plans. 1928 Oct 5 1 10 Typed letter signed by secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Mrs. Mildred Wilkinson, Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Mrs. A.J.R. Houston, and Colonel Frank Rumbold. Notes that a radiogram from Caroline Rumbold had been received, noting her future travel plans to Auckland, Sydney, and Manila. 1928 Oct 5 1 10 Postcard of Auckland, New Zealand, signed Caroline [Rumbold] to Mildred Wilkinson, New York City. Discusses future travel plans and weather. 1928 Oct 9 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Grand Hotel, Rotorua, N.Z. [New Zealand], to “Dear Family.” Describes forest in “Maori country.” Writes of an encounter in which a man expressed his bitterness toward American men and that he called them “the new rich.” 1928 Oct 10 1 10 Typed letter signed by secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Mrs. Mildred R. ilkinson [Wilkinson] and General Frank M. Rumbold. Notes that a cable from Caroline Rumbold was received regarding her picking up $200 at a bank in Bombay. 1928 Oct 11 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Masonic Hotel, Napier, N.Z. [New Zealand], to “Dear Family.” Writes that beautiful scenery in New Zealand could be mistaken for scenery in the United States. Discusses future travel plans. 1928 Oct 18 1 10 Postcard of Hot Springs signed Caroline [Rumbold], Wellington, N.Z. [New Zealand], to Robert [Kohn], New York. Discusses weather and scenery. [1928] Oct 18 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Sydney, to “Dear Family.” Discusses feeling sick during travel across the Tasmanian Sea and the beauty in Sydney. “The Australians like Americans and feel they can talk freely with me.” 1928 Oct 24 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], “Sea. Barrier Reef,” to “Dear Family.” Explains that she is currently sailing between the Great Barrier Reef and the east coast of Australia. Describes scenery and her plans to visit a Catholic missionary. Shares story of a white man and his family who traveled to a flat island with his family and his wife and baby were killed by blacks. “He killed off that tribe.” Includes dinner menu of the S.S. Tango Maru , dated October 28, 1928. [1928] Nov 2 1 10 Typed letter signed by secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Mrs. Mildred R. Wilkinson, and Gen. Frank M. Rumbold. Writes that a radiogram from Caroline Rumbold had been received, expressing her location on “Tango Maru Thursday Island.” 1928 Nov 5 1 10 Letter signed “C” [Caroline Rumbold], on board S.S. Aki Maru , “en route to Brisbane,” to “Dear Family.” Explains that her steamer ran over a reef but was not seriously damaged. Discusses her plans to help a young Catholic priest start a farm on an island. 1928 Nov 6 1 10 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Lemon's Hotel, Brisbane, to “Dear Family.” Wishes her family a Merry Christmas. Writes of Tango Maru accident and discusses future travel plans to see more of Australia. Writes about meeting a man named Rumbold, the only “Rumbold” in Brisbane. 1928 Nov 10 1 10 Typed letter from secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Miss Charlotte Rumbold and General Frank Rumbold. Explains that Caroline Rumbold's radiogram was received, noting that she is delayed in Manila until December 1. 1928 Nov 10 1 10 Letter signed Charlotte [Rumbold], The Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, to [Caroline Rumbold]. Discusses Caroline's travel plans and family news. Tells Caroline to send cables. [1928] Nov 15 1 10 Letter signed Frank [Rumbold] to “My Dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Asks about her receiving money and letters. Writes that the [stock] “market is crazy.” Discusses family news. 1928 Nov 18 1 10 Letter signed Frank [Rumbold] to “My Dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Discusses family news and membership in the stock market. “The market is crazy wild. Mentions he is sending letters that came back to him, to prove that he wrote more letters than she received. Attached letter from April 15, 1928: Letter signed Frank [Rumbold] to “My Dear Tom” [Caroline Rumbold]. Discusses family news and his thoughts and plans regarding the “very wild” stock market. Mentions applying for more patents on electrical inventions. Worries that Hoover will be the Republican nominee. 1928 Nov 23 1 10 Envelope from Astor House Hotel, Shanghai, billing Caroline Rumbold. [1928] Dec 1 10 Receipt on Swatow Lace Company, Ltd., Hong Kong. 1928 Dec 4 1 10 Letter signed Charlotte [Rumbold], Ohio State Conference on City Planning, to [Caroline Rumbold]. Writes that she carries around Caroline's letter written off the Barrier Reef and reads it to anyone who will listen. Expresses apologies that the shipwreck cost Caroline time in China. Discusses family news. 1928 Dec 18 1 10 Letter from all family member, signed Frank [Rumbold], Mildred [Wilkinson], Dot, [signature illegible], May [Engelmann Rumbold Houston], and Charlotte [Rumbold], to Caroline Rumbold. Wish her a Merry Christmas, inquire about Caroline's travels and discuss family holiday plans and experiences. [Christmas 1928] 1 10 Two envelopes addressed to Dr. Caroline Rumbold, c/o Mitsui Bank, Kobe, Japan, from the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, Cleveland, Ohio. One envelope is postmarked San Francisco, California, December 5, 1928; the other is postmarked Peping, January 6, 1929. [1929 Jan] 1 10 Shipping notice from The American Express Company, Inc., New York, New York, regarding Caroline Rumbold’s “embroideries, rugs.” 1929 Jan 20 1 10 Credit note from San Francisco detailing commission deducted on a refund made to Caroline Rumbold on a portion of an unused ticket between Brisbane and Cairns. 1929 Mar 7 1 11 Typed letter signed general passenger agent [signature illegible], San Francisco, to Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Notifies refund of $43.79 to Caroline issued for unused portion of steamer ticket between Brisbane and Cairns. 1929 Mar 14 1 11 Typed letter signed Edwin O'Brien to “C.T. Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. Writes that Caroline will receive the notice of arrival of a shipment from the Express Company soon, and advises her to communicate with a customs broker in Milwaukee, furnishing him with a consular invoice. Two copies of invoice enclosed. 1929 Mar 21 1 11 Typed letter signed secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Notes that registered mail documents regarding her import are enclosed, including a letter and receipt from the American Express Company, notice from the Customs Division of American Express Agency, and an insurance document of the South British Insurance Co. 1929 Mar 25 1 11 Typed letter signed M.E. Dey, M.E. Dey & Co., Inc, Milwaukee, Wis., to Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Asks her to sign enclosed documents for the clearing of a shipment due to arrive in Milwaukee. 1929 Mar 26 1 11 Typed letter signed Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin, to M.E. Dey & Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Explains she is sending M.E. Dey a consular certificate of disinfection, list of articles shipped, a single entry bond, a declaration of purchaser, and the appointment of M.E. Dey and Co. as her custom house agent. 1929 Mar 27 1 11 Typed letter signed M.E. Dey, M.E. Dey & Co., Inc, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Explains that M.E. Dey Custom House Brokers have shipping papers and customs documents covering her shipment from China. 1929 Mar 28 1 11 Bill from M.E. Dey & Co, Inc., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to “Mrs. C.T. Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. 1929 Apr 1 1 11 Statement from Edwin O'Brien Inc. Foreign and Domestic Forwarding Agents Custom Brokers, New York, to “Miss C.T. Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. 1929 Apr 1 1 11 Unsigned letter [from Caroline Rumbold] to “Professor.” Requests advice regarding a box shipped from China filled with purchased items such as coats and brocades, which she had declared were antiques, although the inspector had been unsure. Requests appraisal of items for pay. 1929 Apr 5 1 11 Typed letter signed Secretary Marion Burnham, Milwaukee Art Institute, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to “My dear Miss Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. Explains that a visit to the Customs Office has been made on her behalf and the box will be cleared within a few days. 1929 Apr 8 1 11 Typed letter signed Secretary Marion Burnham, Milwaukee Art Institute, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to “My dear Miss Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. Explains that there are very few antiques among her purchased items. Advises her to come to Milwaukee. 1929 Apr 9 1 11 Typed letter from Caroline T. Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin, to Marion Burnham, Milwaukee Art Institute, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Explains that she cannot go to Milwaukee this month and that she purchased items in China in lots. Requests that Marion Burnham represent her at the appraisal and let her know the amount of the duty. 1929 Apr 11 1 11 Typed letter signed [signature illegible], Edwin O'Brien, Inc., Foreign and Domestic Freight Forwarders, Custom House Brokers, New York, to “Miss C.T. Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. Refers to damaged shipment from China. Assures her that the shipment was at no time opened by customs authorities at their port. Explains that her shipment must have been damaged in San Francisco by the American Express Company. 1929 Apr 24 1 11 Typed letter signed Marion Burnham, Milwaukee Art Institute, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to “My dear Miss Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. Explains that a Mr. Evans has been unable to do anything for the present time regarding her Chinese antiques. 1929 May 2 1 11 Note signed Caroline Rumbold, Madison, to Evan Evans, Custom House, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Explains that she will be at the Customs House May 7. Instructs Charlie Joy to be there so her goods can be appraised. [1929] May 3 1 11 Typed letter signed Marion Burnham, Milwaukee Art Institute, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to “Dear Miss Rumbold” [Caroline Rumbold], Madison, Wisconsin. Notes that her documents are still in the possession of Mr. Evans, who will return them with her package of Chinese antiques. 1929 May 3 1 11 Telegram from W.E. Henschen, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Miss Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Explains that Evans is out of the city until the tenth, when she will be wired. 1929 May 4 1 11 Typed letter signed [signature illegible], Mason, Priestley and Hopkins Attorneys and Counselors, Madison, Wisconsin, to Miss Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Advises her that her merchandise is still in the hands of a New York appraising office and the Milwaukee office will notify them once they are received from New York. 1929 May 29 1 11 Typed letter signed [illegible signature], M.E. Dey & Co., Inc, Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Miss Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Notes that the customs appraiser is waiting for her decision on the matter of items entered as antiques and informs her of duty to be paid. 1929 June 19 1 11 Typed letter signed Walter J. Wilde, collector of customs, Treasury Department, United States Customs Service, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Miss Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Informs her that a check of $5.95 is enclosed due to her overpaying on duties. 1929 Aug 6 1 11 Typed letter signed Richard Rynders, Mason, Priestley and Hopkins, Attorneys and Counselors, Madison, Wisconsin, to Miss Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Explains that he is pleased that “all your Chinese loot eventually arrived safely.” 1929 Oct 1 1 11 Note card detailing a fungus. An address penciled on back of card for Charlie Joy on Broadway. No date 1 11 List of letters Caroline mailed from various posts during her trip around the world. No date 1 11 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], United States Lines, S.S. America , “At Sea,” to “Brother” [Frank Rumbold]. Writes of her departure at New York and that Germans speaking English on board is “one of the tangible signs of who won the war.” No date 1 11 Letter signed Caroline [Rumbold], Union Line, Steamship Marama , “At Sea,” to Frank [Rumbold]. Discusses future travel plans to Manila. “I have grown tired of Eastern Australia.” Expresses thanks for money. Mentions feeling sea-sick. No date 1 11 Hotel Canberra Terms Card offered to waiter to secure seat in dining room. Lists meal hour, tariffs. Address of “Mr. H. R. Gray” scrawled on back of card in pencil. No date 1 11 Caroline Rumbold's luggage ticket on S.S. Tango , N.Y. K. Line, Cabin 19, Destination Manila, P.I. No date 1 11 Typed letter from secretary to Mr. [Robert] Kohn, New York, to Miss Charlotte Rumbold and Gen. Frank M. Rumbold. Copies the cable received from Caroline Rumbold regarding money and letters received and plans to leave Yokohama January 22. No date 1 11 Business card for Jui Hsing Ch’eng, dealer in ancient and modern paintings, scrolls and books, Peking, China. No date 1 11 T.C. Fitz Hugh note card, detailing Chinese goods offered in Peking, China. No date 1 11 Notes about guide books received. No date 1 11 Note card noted on back that it was presented by a Buddhist priest at a Nikko temple. No date 1 11 Envelope advertising “Graca & Co.” in Hong Kong, importers and exporters of postcards, stamps, other goods. No date 1 11 Illustrated broadside with Japanese writing. (OVERSIZE) No date OS: Pollock-R Printed document with Japanese characters. No date 1 11 Engelmann Family Papers Series Typed letter signed “Otto” [Engelmann] to “Dear Cousin” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains that it seems proper for the descendants of their grandfather to meet in commemoration of his leaving his native land for America. “We certainly should be thankful that he did.” Handwritten note on letter says, “It would be a genuine treat to see you at the meeting – it has been years.” [1933] 1 12 Typed letter signed “Otto” [Engelmann] to “Dear Cousin” [Charlotte Rumbold]. Explains that it seems proper for the descendants of their grandfather to meet in commemoration of his leaving his native land for America. “We certainly should be thankful that he did.” Handwritten note on letter says, “It would be a genuine treat to see you at the meeting – it has been years.” circa 1934 1 12 Pamphlet titled “The Engelmann Family in the United States, with Some Historical Background.” Summary about the Engelmann family prepared in 1934 by the Engelmann Cemetery Association, descendants of Theodor Friedrich Engelmann who immigrated to America with his family in 1833. The pamphlet lists Charlotte Rumbold and her siblings as seventh-generation members of the Engelmann family. 1934 Jan 1 12 Photograph of bust of Charlotte Lederberger Rumbold (1839-1894) by her daughter Estelle Rumbold Kohn (1872-1955). 1983 1 12 Typescript titled “Descendants of Charlotte Ledergerber Rumbold Buried in Engelmann Family Cemetery near Shiloh, Illinois.” Includes biographical sketches of Charlotte E. Ledergerger Rumbold, Dr. Thomas Frazier Rumbold, and May Engelmann Rumbold Houston. Charlotte E. Lederberger Rumbold (1839-1894) married Dr. Thomas F. Rumbold, whose previous wife had died, leaving him two small children, Mildred and Frank. She and her husband raised his children and their four daughters: Charlotte, Estella, May, and Caroline. A foster child, Oliver Will Phillips, was also raised by the family. She and her husband moved from St. Louis to San Francisco in the early 1890s; Charlotte died there in 1894. Dr. Thomas Frazier Rumbold (1830-1901) was an internationally known medical specialist of the ear, nose and throat. First doctor in the United States to confine himself to the practice of his specialty. Born in Scotland and left for Canada in 1834, Iowa in 1839. Suffered an accident at age 2 and never walked again on his right leg. Graduated from Jefferson Medical College (now part of Thomas Jefferson University) in 1862, opened his own office in St. Louis in 1866, where he practiced until 1890. Invented a splint for gun-shot fractures of the leg and thigh, along with spray producers treating the nasal passages and throat. May Engelmann Rumbold Houston (1874-1964) married Dr. Albert J. Houston in 1898, moved to San Francisco, had three children and traveled extensively. 1983 June 1 12 Typed biographical sketch of Johanna Engelmann (1854-1933). Johanna Engelmann was born in Shiloh, Illinois, educated in public schools, and a foster-mother to her nephew and niece. No date 1 12 Typed biographical sketch of Mina (Schirmer) Engelmann (1838-1880). Wilhelmina Euphemia Schirmer came to Belleville in 1857, and married Adolph Engelmann the following year. Her first-born died in childbirth and she then had two daughters, Josephine and Anna, and one son, Otto. No date 1 12 Two copies of typed biographical sketches of Josephine Engelmann Fischer (1841-1926). Josephine was born in Shiloh Valley. She married and lived mainly in O'Fallon, Illinois. No date 1 12 Typed biographical sketch of Sophie Engelmann Reuss (1851-1929). Sophie was the second youngest of a family of five children, was raised in public schools of Shiloh and Belleville, married and raised six children on a farm in Shiloh Valley. She served the Red Cross during World War I. No date 1 12 Typed biographical sketch of Julius Reuss (1845-1929). Julius was the second child in a family of nine, received education from a private tutor, and was a member of the “Wide Awake” society during the Civil War. He married Sophie Engelmann and they had six children. He served as director of Cherry Grove School for 27 years and was “overactive in all public affairs.” No date 1 12 Typed biographical sketch of Jenny Caroline Hildenbrandt. Jenny was educated at St. Louis public schools, and spent a year at Columbia University. She was sick a great deal, went to Bavaria to “be cured,” where she became a vegetarian and resorted to natural healing methods. She established the first parent and teacher societies in St. Louis schools and died in 1921. No date 1 12 Typed biographical sketch of Frederick Theodore Engelmann. Frederick attended a “primitive school,” cultivated his father's farm, married and had five children, two of whom died in infancy. No date 1 12 Seventy pages (typed) of letters, all are from Adolph Engelmann to his family except one letter (p. 51) is addressed to “Brothers and Sisters;” one to “Engelmann” from a Capt. Adolphus Keller at Saltillo (p. 68); one written by G.A. Koerner, date unknown (p. 69); and one from C.H. Bridges, War Department, 1932, to Otto B. Engelmann regarding his father’s file (p. 70). Otherwise all letters are typed transcripts translated from German, written by Lieutenant Adolph Engelmann (enrolled into service in Captain Raith's Company, second regiment (Bissels), Illinois Foot Volunteer). He writes to his parents during the Mexican War, 1846-1847. Discusses living conditions at his campsites, travel across the prairie and weather conditions, as he makes his way from Illinois south into Mexican territory where he anticipates battle with the Mexican army, which occurs in February of 1947 in “Saltillo,” when Adolph is wounded after a bullet lodges in his inner arm, remaining there until he returns home. Throughout the letters, Adolph details his visit to an Indian camp; writes that “the country was swarming with Indians with hostile intentions.” Writes about his troop's dissatisfaction with their general “whose pettiness becomes daily more apparent” (p. 39) and his impressions of Mexicans as “very dirty . . . picking lice off each other . . . .” (p. 20). Meets a man who tells him that a third of the natives “have long wished for our coming; one third are independent; the other one third are our enemies” (p. 40). He writes that all volunteers of his section are regretful that they ever left home, that it is hard for a “free American to accustom himself to the discipline and Aristocracy of the Army” (p. 47), and that President Polk's administration is “as unpopular with us as it possibly can be” (p. 62). He explains that while his troop marched so far that they long hoped for battle. He writes that the Arkansas regiment has lost men leaving camp as they were “lassoed and dragged by Mexicans” the regiment then took vengeance on between 18-30 Mexican civilians in the hills (p. 57-58). No date 1 11 General Correspondence Series Letter signed Col. F.M. Rumbold, France, to “My Dear Joe.” Discusses pending “move up to the line.” Explains that an eight-week course took four weeks and that American soldiers are doing very well. Shares story about asking one of his officers how his men were doing. “They are eating it up.” Discusses French mentality. 1918 July 30 1 13 Letter signed M.E.B. [Mary E. Bulkley], Blossoms Hotel, Chester, to Horace [Swope]. Discusses travels. 1920 June 16 1 13 Typed letter of M.E.B. [Mary E. Bulkley], Bowness-On-Windermere, Westmoreland, to Horace [Swope]. Discusses her joy at Harding's nomination and prediction at votes piling up for [Eugene] Debs “as a protest against misrepresentative government.” Writes that America is behind England in social consciousness. 1920 July 3 1 13 Unsigned letter [Frank Rumbold] to “My Dear Joe.” Charlotte [Rumbold]'s letter on back. Explains that Tom [Caroline Rumbold] is confused over money matters while abroad. Notes on back of letter regarding money sent abroad. 1928 Aug 9 1 13 Typed letter of Frank [Rumbold], “On Board,” to “My Dear Wife.” Discusses life at sea and tells her not to worry about him. No date 1 13 Typed letter unsigned [Frank Rumbold] to “My Dear Wife.” Discusses journey at sea. Writes that she is never out of his mind. “You are with me always, I seem to feel your presence.” No date 1 13 Charlotte Rumbold Speeches Series Typed speech on “Cleveland Housing,” presenting plan from the committee on housing and sanitation of the Chamber of Commerce. Explains that workmen who moved to cities from towns, women entering the workforce and “Negroes” migrating from the south are facing a housing shortage. Proposes that Cleveland employers finance a second mortgage for their employees. Proposes plan in which employers will invest part of their capital and divide with their workmen. Workers will get houses for less than commercial rates. “The city of Cleveland and the nation are the real gainers for every home is a defense against enemies within or without.” (5 pages) 1917 June 13 1 14 Typed speech/investigation titled “Investigation of Bunk Houses Made by Mr. Moses, Mr. Riddle and Miss Rumbold.” Papers critique bunk housing for inadequate living conditions: cleanliness, sleeping and eating conditions. Papers praise New York Central Railroad camp for its cooking and dining cars, cleanliness, and toilets connected with a sewer. (6 pages) 1918 July 11 1 14 Handwritten notes on community centers. Discusses public schools, slums, and role of a community center helping to educate public. No date 1 14 Handwritten notes on streets. “Streets are more than part of the traffic . . . They are the place in which a large part of the community spends the most interesting and often the most educative part of its life.” She encourages the Peace Strategy Board to consider placing benches along streets and plan for a “handsome, stately, reviewing stand” for parades and processions. No date 1 14 42 index cards with penned notes regarding city life, clubs, preparation for speeches. No date 1 15 Typed speech on “Cooperative housing.” Defines cooperative housing as the common control and ownership of homes by tenants. Explains reasons for and advantages to residents within cooperative housing. “With over one-half of our population residing in cities, the housing of families has undergone a radical change. The family's home and retreat once under complete control of the householder has largely disappeared, and in its stead has grown the apartment house under control of a landlord interested solely in more profits . . . Cooperative housing is the reassertion of the right of the man with a family to control the house in which he lives for the benefit of himself and his family.” Explains that England's method for developing cooperative housing will be adopted: “the state helping the people to help themselves.” Discusses groups in Brooklyn and Manhattan that organized cooperative housing, and how cooperation works, principles in cooperative laws of state of New York: “Every stockholder has one vote regardless of the stock he owns . . .” Names the most essential requirement as the tenant-owners possessing “the full power and the right machinery to control their own affairs . . .” Explains how to work out operating expenses, and having a sound plan for amortization, favorable social conditions and efficient management. (11 pages) No date 1 16 Typed speech on “Housing as Affected by War Industries” with accompanying six index cards outlining speech. Explains reasons for Cleveland's housing shortage. “We did exactly what England had done – Built the plants and forgot absolutely that we had to house the workmen.” Discusses bunk houses that went up and living conditions of the worker. Explains that philanthropy will not touch problem, but that business is concerned with the housing of workers. She suggests raising wages so “it goes into clean living, comfortable bed, wholesome food and dry clothing . . . The well run home becomes an efficient extension of the efficient shop.” Cites the passed bill appropriating $50 million for the shipping board to house workers who build ships and the bill before Congress for $50 million for the housing of munitions and aviation workers as “a beginning.” “Each man's work and consequently each man's health is a national asset . . .” (15 pages). Also includes six note cards on the same topic. No date 1 16 Typed speech titled “A Mess of Potage” by Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, Cleveland, Ohio. Papers discuss country’s housing conditions for immigrant workers during wartime, which she asserts is suppressed by the newspapers. Explains the advantage to industry in giving workers ten cents an hour more so he has a stake in the community. “The well run home becomes an efficient extension of the efficient shop.” Explains that self-respecting housing will raise the entire community standard of living. Some of main points also made in speech “Housing as Affected by War Industries.” Discussion of government intervention in creating more equal housing for all. (10 pages) No date 1 16 Typed speech titled “Standardizing Districts.” Explains the confusion and wastefulness to workers resulting from municipalities having no universal standards. Explains that cities are removed from both each other and within each city’s fire, police, school, health departments. Argues for establishing building districts when the city plan is being studied, “so that the City Plan may be humanized.” Argues that a standardized district would also allow for a community center to house all community and social branches, focusing toward a “central body of workers.” (5 pages) No date 1 16 Handwritten notes (9 pages) titled “Women in Industry” with typed speech (14 pages) of same title. Quotes Lenin’s manifesto. Explains that the woman’s job is to find the relationship between work and happiness. Gendered discussion of business. Argues that women entering industry will not result in breaking up the institution of family. “The benevolent amateur is the only one who believes that the wife can be shut out of industry and the husband’s wages raised so that the wife will not have to earn.” Discussion of women gaining powers, to consume, to vote, and now the power of business, which she deems stronger than politics. Argues that war has given a democratic society a mass community interest. Ends by discussing peace, which “will be as romantic as war.” No date 1 17 Caroline Rumbold Travel Diaries Series Caroline Rumbold’s diary marked “My Travels Abroad.” Discusses planning for her trip, life at sea, travels, spending time with Marie Heck, cultural experiences (theatre and art), meeting other passengers when on board the S.S. Toledo , taking to drinking whiskey and water, description of natural life. She calls African “natives” “ugly” on June 21. She writes of large turtles who “eat the remnants of human bodies” on July 30. Caroline Rumbold’s business card is tucked into the diary, along with a typed letter signed Leo Fischer to General F.M. [Frank Meeker] Rumbold about his experience visiting with Caroline Rumbold in Manila (148 pages). 1928 Mar 19-June 4 2 1 Black leather diary marked “Caroline Rumbold, U.S. Department of Agriculture.” Diary discusses travel observations, descriptions of natural life, notes about her work. She discusses rumors of natives in Western Australia who are cannibals (September 1). “Sometimes they ate their babies.” Discussion of American life with Australians (September 11). Note about finding information about chemistry and preservation of wood tucked into diary, along with notebook about purchases and travel notes, wallet-size photographs of soldier [Frank Rumbold?] and 11 other photographs of scenery and soldiers, with one photograph “Lt. Colonel Walter Warner” and “Major Horace S. Rumsey.” Note card to Colonel Rumbold in envelope with photographs (122 pages). [1928] Aug 12-Oct 15 2 1 Black leather diary detailing travel observations. World map tucked into pages, with notes about foreign items purchased scrawled on back of map. Card for Chinese jewelry, Wisconsin Journal column about Caroline Rumbold’s “pleasure trip around the world,” and clipped October 10, 1937 New York Times article about missionaries working with “half-castes” on Hammond Island also tucked in pages. Caroline discusses “half-castes” on Hammond Island in her November 2 entry. Description of natural environment. Writes of street beggars who followed her in December 22 entry, her travels through China with “Carl Janish.” Travel observations regarding Japanese temples and comparison of Japanese railroad service to United States railroad service on January 12, along with Tokyo gardens and shrines on January 19. Discusses her return to the U.S. via California (189 pages). 1928 Oct 16-1929 Feb 11 2 1 Miscellaneous Series Scrapbook titled “Album of Good Wishes by Forestettes” [to Caroline Rumbold] (12 pages). U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. Photographs pasted in album of colleagues. Photograph of Caroline Rumbold taken in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1941. In pen: “At home, at work, at play, our good wishes will go your way, Caroline Rumbold.” No Date 2 2 Ten black and white photographs. One of brick house with pencil on back: “For Caroline, Wherever she is! M.E.B. [Mary E. Bulkley].” Photograph with pen on back, “Caroline Rumbold, 1919.” Three copies of photograph of woman’s profile, with pencil on back of one noting, “probably Charlotte Elizabeth Ledegerber” [Lederberger]. No Date 2 2 Booklet titled “Housing Conditions in St. Louis, Report of the Housing Committee of The Civic League of St. Louis,” text by Charlotte Rumbold, published by The Civic League of St. Louis (84 pages). Aims to prove wrong the public’s impression “that we have no housing problems.” House-to-house investigation between Seventh and Fourteenth Streets, Lucas Avenue and O’Fallon Street, with Franklin Avenue omitted. Housing Committee states that this section was chosen “because of the many different phases of the situation caused largely by the different nationalities represented.” Discussion of overcrowding of rooms, cleanliness, garbage, yard toilets. Tracks how residents live, sleep, die, where children play, lack of water supply, bathtubs, slop sinks. Compares St. Louis to New York and Chicago. Urges St. Louis to revise housing laws. States that race and ethnicity does not affect how people live. Argues that housing conditions affect death rates. Discussion of woman’s role in the home, working to keep her family and environment clean. Includes black and white photographs and tables. Advises changes in and additions to ordinances concerning plumbing, adequate space, lighting, and cleanliness. No Date 2 3 United States passport for Caroline Rumbold. (OVERSIZE) 1905 Apr 20 OS: Pollock-R Typed letter signed Marshall S. Snow, dean of the college, Washington University, “to whom it may concern.” Writes that Caroline Rumbold was admitted as a candidate for the masters of arts in 1901, conferred in 1903. Rumbold was admitted as a Ph.D. candidate in 1902, her major subject Botany, with plans to graduate during the year 1905-06. 1905 Apr 25 2 4 Typed letter signed A.F. Woods, chief pathologist and physiologist, United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Washington, D.C. Certifies that Caroline Rumbold has been connected with the Bureau of Plant Industry since 1902 in various capacities. Explains her experience in dealing with problems of plant pathology and the high quality of her work. 1905 May 3 2 4 Printed letter signed G. Dittman, chief proctor. Notes that the invitation to a rigorous exam is included. Requests a confirmation card (in German). 1907 Nov 25 2 4 Invitation to a rigorous exam (in German). 1907 Nov 25 2 4 Travel Expense Voucher, United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, Washington, D.C. Account of Charlotte Rumbold. Total travel expense of $43.30. 1918 Apr 13 2 4 National Congress for a League of Nations Delegate Appointment to Charlotte Rumbold, attached order form to enroll as a delegate representing the Missouri branch of the League to Enforce Peace at sessions at the St. Louis of the National Congress for a League of Nations, February 25-26, 1919. [1919] 2 4 Green ribbon from the Fourth Annual Convention of the Woman Suffrage Party of Greater Cleveland. “Alternate.” 1919 Jan 24-25 2 4 United States of America passport of Caroline Rumbold. 1924 June 13 2 4 Postcard without postage from Fanny Garrison. “In memory of happy college days.” 1928 2 4 The United States Department of Agriculture notes that Caroline Rumbold, assistant pathologist in the Bureau of Plant Industry, will visit Brazil, Argentina, Australia, China, and British India, in connection with the work of the department. “She is hereby introduced and cordially commended to all persons with whom she may come in contact . . .” 1928 Feb 8 2 4 Typed letter from R.W. Dunlap, acting secretary, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., to “The Honorable, The Secretary of State.” Requests state department to issue a special passport for Dr. Rumbold in her work securing specimens for study. 1928 Feb 10 2 4 United States of America passport of Caroline Rumbold. 1928 Feb 20 2 4 Typed letter signed Frank[?] B. Kellogg, Department of State, Washington, “To the American Diplomatic and Consular Officers.” Explains that Dr. Caroline Rumbold is about to proceed abroad. “I cordially bespeak for Doctor Rumbold such courtesies and assistance as you may be able to render . . .” 1928 Mar 14 2 4 “A Patho-Mycological Nut Test.” Typed joke with word games involving plants. No date 2 4 Irene Odinsova’s business card, Associate Charities, Cleveland. No date 2 4 Note card with notes scrawled. No date 2 4 Index card with notes regarding theatre and recreation. No date 2 4 Handwritten “copy” of information regarding Caroline Rumbold’s place of residency “to Charlotte M. Rumbold.” 1940 Nov 13 2 5 Letter signed Vergil D. Reed, acting director of the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Washington D.C., to Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio, regarding Caroline Rumbold. Notes that the census of 1920 lists Caroline Rumbold, age 42, as living alone. 1941 Feb 11 2 5 Typed postcard signed Vergil D. Reed, acting director of the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C., to Miss Caroline T. Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Notes that her request for census data will be compiled as soon as possible. 1941 Feb 28 2 5 Letter signed Vergil D. Reed, acting director of the Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C., to Miss Charlotte Rumbold, Cleveland, Ohio, regarding Caroline Rumbold. Notes that the census of 1920 lists Caroline Rumbold, age 42, as living alone. 1941 Apr 15 2 5 Letter signed registrar [illegible signature], Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, Office of the Registrar. Notes that Caroline Thomas Rumbold entered Smith College and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1901. 1941 June 6 2 5 Affidavit, state of Ohio, two copies. Charlotte Rumbold sworn under oath states the birth date of her sister Caroline Rumbold. Says that she was given a ring for Christmas in 1877 because of her care and affection for her little sister. The ring was inscribed as “C to C.” 1941 May 13 2 5 Affidavit, state of Wisconsin, four copies. Caroline Rumbold sworn under oath states that she was issued passports in February of 1924 and 1928. Three copies of photocopies of passports attached as Exhibits 1 and 2. 1941 June 6 2 5 Invoice for Caroline T. Rumbold for “camera floater,” for $99.50. 1942 May 21 2 5 Typed letter signed Robert M. Salter, chief of bureau, United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Washington, to Dr. Caroline Rumbold, Madison, Wisconsin. Grants Caroline Rumbold retirement, though her separation from service is regretted. Writes, “you were among the first to do fundamental research on injection of chemicals in an attempt to control a plant disease.” Writes of her contribution to phytopathology. 1942 June 22 2 5 Typed postcard from F.R. Moulton, permanent secretary, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Smithsonian Institution Building, Washington, D.C., to Dr. Caroline Rumbold. Change of address acknowledgement. 1942 Nov 21 2 5 Envelope to Dr. Caroline T. Rumbold, Winter Park, Florida, from Cleveland, Ohio. List of names written on envelope and three pieces of paper, in different scripts. 1945 Dec 4 2 5 Envelope torn with notes that papers were taken from a safety deposit box in Madison, Wisconsin, for Caroline T. Rumbold: birth certificate documents, passports, U.S. Department of Agriculture letters of introduction, and degrees. 1946 Dec 4 2 5 St. Paul’s Chapel, Columbia University, New York, postcard, unmarked. No date 2 5 Buckingham Hotel, opposite Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri, envelope. No date 2 5 Copied certificate of birth for Caroline Thomas Rumbold, born July 27, 1877, state of Missouri. No date 2 5 Clipped newspaper editorial titled “The Fight in Wisconsin,” by Rodney Dutcher, NEA Service Writer. Discusses Robert M. La Folette’s political career. No year Aug 18 2 6 Booklet titled “Speaking at Seventy” by Mary E. Bulkley. Twelve pages of poems. No date 2 6 18 postcards – 12 are an ongoing note to Charlotte Rumbold from Horace Swope. Postcard 1: Horace Swope notes that these are a bunch of postcards that he accumulated that he thought Charlotte would enjoy. The first is “Procesion de la Semana Santa.” The second and third are of “pelote basque a chistera” players – similar to jai alai, which Horace Swope writes is like glorified handball. The fourth is titled “La Cote D’Argent,” the fifth of “Les Pyrenees, Gavarnie – La Gave et la Vue generale du Cirque,” where Horace Swope stopped overnight. The sixth is a photograph of a woman titled “Scenes et Types Des Pyrenees.” The seventh is of La Basilique in Lourdes, southwestern France. The eighth and ninth are more “Scenes et Types Des Pyrenees,” the tenth is of a benediction, again at Lourdes. The eleventh postcard depicts women with large pots balancing on their heads in Biarritz, and the last is of a procession “a l’Esplanade” at Lourdes. The other postcards were sent to Charlotte Rumbold from Horace Swope in Europe, 1917-1919. One depicts Marseille, another three Montpellier, another a depiction of St. Paul, one of Paris city streets, another of the Field Columbian Museum in Jackson Park in Chicago, another of Pittsburgh at night, another a cathedral at Frejus, a coastal town in Southern France. Another depicts Cite de Carcassonne, a French town, another scene in Frejus, and lastly, what may be Camp Pike, French barracks during World War I. No date 2 6 Caroline Rumbold’s diplomas: nine items, includes some duplicates. Her college preparatory certificate from Hosmer Hall, bachelor’s degree diploma from Smith College, and master’s degree and doctoral degree diplomas from Washington University. All diplomas are in Latin except for Hosmer Hall. (OVERSIZE) No date OS: Pollock-R