date(s):
1874-1949
creator(s):
Cook, Fannie Frank, 1893-1949
subject(s):
Race relations; African Americans; Sharecroppers; Sharecropping; Civil rights; Publishers and publishing; Literature; Books and reading; Essays; Poetry; Short stories; Scrapbooks
place(s):
St. Louis, MO, USA; Missouri, USA; United States
type(s):
Documentary Artifacts; Collection
A0322 Cook, Fannie Frank Papers Inventory of Fannie Frank Cook Papers A0322 EAD by Jaime Bourassa using ArchivesSpace Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center 2016 225 S. Skinker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63105 archives@mohistory.org URL: This finding aid was produced using ArchivesSpace on 2018-09-27 06:27:20 -0500 . English Describing Archives: A Content Standard English Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center Fannie Frank Cook Papers Cook, Fannie Frank, 1893-1949 A0322 17.0 Cubic Feet (31 boxes; 12 volumes) 1874-1949 The Papers of Fannie Cook (1893-1949), St. Louis writer, lecturer and civic leader, include personal and professional correspondence, literary productions, printed material and scrapbooks of clippings and memorabilia reflect her life-long interest in the common ground of literature and social problems. Believing literature could be a great molder of public opinion, Fannie Cook wrote novels, short stories, essays and poetry, a significant portion of which portrayed a strong social conscience. Much of the material for her writings came from her years of involvement in civic organizations and committees concerned with racial prejudices and social injustices in her community and state. The papers span her literary career and consist of extensive correspondence with agents, publishers and magazine editors. Letters deal with a broad range of issues from negotiations regarding the sale of manuscripts, remarks on her works-in-progress, to her more personal observations about life and work. Her manuscripts include various stages of drafts of published and unpublished novels, short stories, essays, poetry, book reviews, editorials and radio scripts. Notes and drafts for numerous speeches and radio interviews are also included. Not only do her papers record the development of a writer, but they give us an insight into the struggle for justice and human rights in St. Louis during the 1930s and forties. Assuming her full share of leadership in civic activities, she chaired the Department of Race Relations of the Community Council of St. Louis (1930-1934), the St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of Sharecroppers (1939-1949), and was a member of the Executive Committee of the St. Louis Race Relations Commission (1943-1946). Committee records and correspondence among her papers document the work of these groups as they dealt with the contemporary issues of education and health care for blacks, integration of public facilities, and the plight of the sharecroppers in southeast Missouri. The papers also include material from her involvement with the League of Women Voters of St. Louis, the Liberal Voters League and the People's Art Center. Records and correspondence from Fannie Cook's early years with the League of Women Voters center around her work as chairperson of the League's Education Committee. Files of the Liberal Voters League tell of her work as a member of the Board of Directors and Political Action Committee and the organization's interest in promoting the causes of liberal candidates. As a member of the Board of Directors of the People's Art Center, her papers document the organization's purpose and work as the only integrated art center in the metropolitan area in the 1940s. The Fannie Cook Papers span the years from 1874-1949 with the bulk of the collection covering her active years as a writer. Processing Information Processed by Jean Douglas Streeter, 1988. Donor Information Fannie Cook donated her papers to the Missouri Historical Society over a period of years from 1946-1949. Biographical Sketch Fannie Frank, daughter of Julius and Jennie Frank, was born October 4, 1893, in St. Charles, Missouri. Her family moved to St. Louis when Mr. Frank became connected with the Rice-Stix Dry Goods Company of St. Louis, in 1898. She graduated from Soldan High School (1911), the University of Missouri (1914), and received her master's degree from Washington University in 1916. She married Dr. Jerome Cook, director of medicine and chief of staff at Jewish Hospital; they had two sons. Fannie Cook was a versatile writer who was actively interested in problems of contemporary society and whose literary works of fiction and nonfiction were often based on her political and social attitudes. She died August 25, 1949, following a heart attack. Life Events 1893 Born in St. Charles, Missouri, on October 4; daughter of Julius and Jennie Frank; brothers, Simon M. Frank and J. William Frank. 1898 Family moved to St. Louis when father became connected with the Rdice-Stix Dry Goods Company of St. Louis; father vice-president of the Frank & Meyer Neckwear Company at time of his death in 1917; she attened St. Louis public schools; submitted poetry and stories to the St. Nicholas Magazine before she was 12, and while not published, received encouraging criticism. 1911 Graduated from Soldan High School; entered the University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, in the fall. 1913 Attended summer school at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. 1914 Received Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Missouri after three years and the summer session at the University of Wisconsin. 1915 Entered Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, to study for her Master's degree; married Dr. Jerome F. Cook, October 28; Dr. Cook, a practicing physician, became director of medicine and chief of staff at Jewish Hospital. 1916 Received her M.A. degree from Washington University. First son, Robert Jerome Cook, born. 1918-1935 Part-time lecturer in English at Washington University. 1919 Second son, Howard Frank Cook, born. 1924 Began long career of public service: was member of the League of Women Voters of St. Louis and chairman of their Education Committee; was editor of the Missouri Bulletin , the state publication of the League of Women Voters, from 1931-1935; was also member of the Women's National League for Peace and Freedom and edited their newsletter for one year. 1930 Appointed chairman of the Race Relations Committee of the Community Council of St. Louis; held that position for several years. 1935 Resigned teaching position and all organizational responsibilities to devote major effort to writing; attended the Writer's Conference in the Rocky Mountains-University of Colorado. 1936 Entered the Reader's Digest contest for new writers and won one of the ten first prizes ($1,000) for her article, “The House That Cannot Succeed.” 1937 Began her association with literary agent, Ann Watkins. 1938 First novel, The Hill Grows Steeper, published by G.P. Putnam's Sons. 1939 Formed a committee with St. Louis novelist, Josephine Johnson, to aid the sharecroppers in southeast Missouri following their roadside demonstration in January along Highways 60 and 61 near Sikeston, Missouri; was chairperson of the St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of the Sharecroppers until it was dissolved in 1949. 1941 Second novel, Boot-Heel Doctor , published by Dodd, Mead & Company, September 9. 1943 Appointed to the St. Louis Mayor's Race Relations Commission; was a mem9ber of the Executive Committee and served on the Public Relations Committee; resigned from the commission in 146. Was among those who started the People's Art Center, an interracial cultural institution which grew out of the Missouri WPA Art Project of 1942; served on Board of Directors until her death. 1944 Received, along with Josephine Johnson Cannon, the Urban League Citation of Merit for their work with the sharecroppers. Joined the Liberal Voters League and served on their Board of Directors and Political Action Committee. 1946 Third novel, Mrs. Palmer's Honey, published by Doubleday & Company, Inc.; received the George Washington Carver Memorial Award ($2,500) given by Doubleday for the novel showing “. . .the importance of the Negro's place in American life.” Received the St. Louis Argus Award for her “Outstanding Contributions to Inter-Racial Welfare.” Pursued her interest in painting as a means of improving her writing; exhibited water-color portrait, “Millicent,” at the St. Louis Artists Guild. 1948 Supported formation of the Progressive Party of Missouri; served on the Missouri Citizens for Wallace Committee and the National Wallace for President Committee. Fourth novel, Storm Against the Wall , published by Doubleday & Company, Inc., March 11. Had solo art exhibit in spring of 1948. 1949 Died August 25, following a heart attack; memorial service held September 23, 1949, at the Sheldon Memorial. Fifth novel, The Long Bridge , published posthumously by Doubleday & Company, Inc. Scope and Contents The Fannie Cook Papers reflect the life and work of a versatile writer who was actively interested in problems of contemporary society and whose literary works of fiction and non-fiction were often based on her political and social attitudes. Soon after receiving her Master's degree from Washington University in 1916 she began part-time university teaching and a career as a public servant, participating in community efforts along educational lines and in the field of race relations. It was not until 1935 that she gave up teaching to begin her professional career as a writer. The bulk of the Fannie Cook Papers pertain to these years, 1935 until her untimely death in 1949, documenting not only her development as a writer, but her active role as a lecturer and civic leader. The papers contain correspondence regarding St. Louis race relations and southern Missouri sharecroppers; records of the St. Louis Race Relations Commission, St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of Sharecroppers, and People's Art Center; correspondence with publishers and literary agents; literary manuscripts including those for articles, essays, poems, short stories and novels; scrapbooks; and photographs. The The Fannie Cook Papers are arranged by form of material into five major series: 1) Correspondence ; 2) Literary Productions ; 3) Printed Material ; 4) Photographic Material ; and 5) Scrapbooks . Series I, Correspondence , has been arranged in four sub-series which reflect the major interests of Fannie Cook's life. The subseries are as follows: 1) Family Correspondence (1874-1884; 1909-1949); 2) General Correspondence (1925-1949); 3) Public Service Correspondence (1923-1949); 4) Literary Career Correspondence (1920-1949) Letters from relatives and members of Fannie Cook's immediate family, her husband, Jerome, and two sons, Robert Jerome and Howard Frank Cook, are filed in the Family Correspondence Sub-series of the Correspondence Series. The collection contains only a few letters from each of them as well as two letters written by Fannie Cook's father, Julius Frank, a German Jew who came to the United States in 1881 and settled in St. Charles, Missouri. His letters, written in 1896 to his brother William, discuss the current political scene and financial question of free silver. The greater part of the Family Correspondence Sub-series is a selection of correspondence from relatives in Germany seeking Fannie Cook's help in obtaining affidavits, making it possible for them to come to the United States to escape Hitler's persecution of the Jews. The letters, written between 1937-1940, concern the families of Fannie Cook's two aunts, Bertha Frank Oppenheimer and Adeiheid Frank Lehman. Translations of several of the German letters are available. Additional letters in the subseries are letters of congratulation from relatives on the occasion of the publication of her novels. Family legal documents and memorabilia have also been filed here. The General Correspondence Sub-Series (1925-1949) contains letters of request, letters of appreciation and congratulatory mail. Fannie Cook was a popular lecturer at schools, churches, synagogues, civic organizations and public gatherings when the topics for discussion were interracial, legislative or literary subjects. Correspondence includes letters making arrangements for these talks, often followed by letters of appreciation for her appearances; other letters refer to a variety of civic occasions in which she participated. Letters of congratulation are from friends and the public following the publication of her first novel, The Hill Grows Steeper , and the announcement in 1945 that she had won the George Washington Carver Award for Mrs. Palmer's Honey . Additional letters of congratulations can also be found in several of her scrapbooks. Public Service Correspondence Sub-Series (1923-1949) documents Fannie Cook's involvement over a twenty-five year period with civic organizations and committees, both local and national, which engaged the social and political issues of the day. Material in the sub-series has been arranged according to the name of the committee or organization. The organizational records, when available, such as minutes, financial documents, reports and position papers, have been kept with the correspondence. Her commitment to working for better relations between the races was demonstrated by the leadership roles she assumed with several committees and organizations. For several years she was chairperson of the Department of Race Relations of the Community Council of St. Louis which acted as a clearinghouse to remove misunderstanding among the races, and served as the arbiter for controversial questions in the community. Correspondence, reports, minutes of executive committee meetings and subcommittees provide important information concerning several controversies: the location of hospital #2 (Homer G. Phillips Hospital); the use of Franklin School as a vocational school for Negroes; the question of a consolidated high school for Negroes in the county; and the establishment of training courses for Negro social workers at Washington University. Her short story, "Black Liberty," was based on the experience she had while serving as a chairman of the committee and being charged with the responsibility of getting unanimity on the location for Homer G. Phillips Hospital. In January 1939, following the sharecroppers sit-down strike along south-east Missouri highways, Fannie Cook and fellow novelist Josephine Johnson, organized the St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of the Sharecroppers (sometimes referred to as the Missouri Committee for the Rehabilitation of the Sharecroppers). The committee sought immediate ways to provide relief for the homeless families who were protesting unfair practices in the Sharecropper system. After an initial purchase of 90 acres of land near Poplar Bluff, Missouri, where several hundred of the farm workers settled, the committee continued to work for improved conditions for the sharecroppers and to promote general interest in their welfare. As chairman of this committee for ten years, Fannie Cook's files hold a wealth of primary material documenting the settlement of Cropperville (the name given to the sharecropper camp) and the succeeding years as a cooperative homesteading community. Correspondence with businessmen and church leaders, as well as political and government officials, including Eleanor Roosevelt and members on the staff of the Farm Security Administrations (FSA) tells of the organizing effort of the St. Louis Committee and the continued struggle to address the inequities in the sharecropping system. Extensive information may be found regarding FSA's cooperative farm projects in southeast Missouri. Correspondence with Owen Whitfield, the black minister-union official who led the sharecroppers in their exodus on to the highway, provides candid details of the sharecroppers' plight and the role of the Southern Tenant Farmer's Union and The United Cannery, Agricultural Packing and Allied Workers of America Union in addressing the situation. Subsequent letters to Fannie Cook throughout the decade from Owen, his wife Zella, and other camp leaders provide excellent commentary on the day-to-day living in Cropperville. The building of a clinic and bathhouse/laundry facility are well documented in the correspondence with officials of the American Friends Service Committee. This organization conducted summer work camps at Cropperville in 1941 and 1942, and their reports and a journal kept by Holland Hunter, a summer camp worker, are of particular interest. Additional organizational material belonging to the committee includes financial records, minutes and legal documents. Some of Fannie Cook's writings which reflect her experience with the sharecroppers are her novel Boot-Heel Doctor , and "A Killer's Knife Aint Holy," "Zorella's Hat," and "Seeds Without Soil," stories which appeared in national magazines. From 1943-1946, Fannie Cook served on the St. Louis Race Relations Commission, a committee of 72 black and white citizens, active in civic affairs, appointed by the mayor. Its purpose was to promote good will between racial groups, and to adopt measures which would bring greater equality of opportunity in the field of housing, health, employment, education and recreation. An active member of the commission's Executive Committee and Public Relations Committee, Fannie Cook's papers reveal her continuous effort to abolish segregation in public accommodations. Correspondence with committee members and minutes and progress reports of sub-committees provide significant information regarding the effort of the commission to integrate the St. Louis department store lunch counters and to have St. Louis Board of Aldermen adopt a Fair Employment Practice Ordinance. Correspondence also describes her efforts to end segregation of hotels and theaters: it was because of her determination to see the commission make a stand for full integration of the theaters that the chairman of the commission asked for her resignation, which she tendered, September 26, 1946. Her third novel, Mrs. Palmer's Honey , published in 1946, is a treatment of the race issue and segregation practices in St. Louis. Several other committees occupied Fannie Cook's time and attention during the 1930s-1940s, but her involvement with these committees were usually for shorter periods of time. The quantity of material in the collection is limited generally to one or two folders for the following committees: Committee on Household Service Problems (Urban League); Missouri Citizens for Wallace; National Committee to Aid Victims of German Fascism; National Wallace for President Committee; Permanent Council on Relief Needs; Progressive Citizens of America; Progressive Party of Missouri; and St. Louis Citizens' Committee on Displaced Persons. Another significant group of material in this subseries is Fannie Cook's files concerning her work as a member of several civic organizations. Records and correspondence from her early involvement with the League of Women Voters of St. Louis in the 1920s focus on her work as chairperson of the Education Committee and the League's interest in the Forest City Manufacturing Company's strike. In the mid-forties, she became involved with the Liberal Voters League of St. Louis, serving on the Board of Directors as well as the Political Action Committee. These files contain material concerning the 1944 Congressional elections, local membership drives, and the debate concerning the St. Louis chapter's affiliation with a national progressive organization. In 1946 she was selected to serve on the Executive Committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), hut there is little in the collection concerning her involvement with the group. There is more extensive material, however, pertaining to her involvement with the People's Art Center, an organization begun in 1942 as part of the Missouri WPA Art Project, and on whose Board of Directors Fannie Cook served for several years. Her collection of correspondence, organizational reports, and minutes provide a fairly comprehensive account of the center's work and effort to survive as a place in St. Louis where people of all races could study art in the 1940s. Additional correspondence pertaining to Fannie Cook's own personal effort to better race relations in her community, outside of her committee and organizational responsibilities, have been filed at the end of the subseries in Letters to the Editors and Race Relations. Among these files is correspondence with Irving Dillard and Ralph Coghlan of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch , Henry Wheeler of the St. Louis American , Bishop William Scarlett of the Diocese of Missouri, and George L. Vaughn, the attorney in the celebrated Shelly vs. Kraemer case. Fannie Cook's professional correspondence as a writer is filed in the Literary Career subseries. In the summer of 1935, realizing her desire to write was greater than the work she was doing, she gave up teaching and lecture courses, and for a few years organizational affiliations, to devote the better part of each day to writing. She attended the Writer's Conference at the University of Colorado, and at the end of a year had her first major encouragement: she won one of the ten first prizes, ($1,000) in the Reader's Digest contest for new writers. A versatile writer, over the next decade she produced numerous short stories, articles, poetry and five novels, relying extensively on her experience in the life of the community for subject matter. Her work contains much that was actual though the material was frequently adopted to fictional form. Occasionally she worked up a theme into more than one type of literary form, both as short story and as article. Her professional correspondence with literary agents, publishers, and editors of numerous magazines and journals have been arranged accordingly. Not only do they record the negotiations regarding the sale of her manuscripts, but the letters document the progress of her work and are a glimpse of an emerging writer learning her craft. Of particular interest is her extensive correspondence with two literary agents, Ann Watkins (1937-1944) and Maxim Lieber (1944-1949). They provided generous remarks on her works-in-progress to which Fannie Cook responded in kind. Also of note is the correspondence with editors at G.P. Putnam's Sons (publisher of The Hill Grows Steeper , 1938), Dodd, Mead & Company (publisher of Boot-Hill Doctor , 1941), and Doubleday & Company, Inc. (publisher of Mrs. Palmer's Honey , 1946, Storm Against the Wall , 1948, and The Long Bridge , 1949). These letters, too, offer critical support of manuscripts as well as business information relating to publication of her novels. Correspondence with editors of more than 70 magazines and journals provide a thorough accounting of her publishing career documenting her submissions, rejections, and publications of articles and short stories from 1920 to 1949. Her short stories (usually humorous accounts of situations containing pathos) and articles appeared in several national magazines, among them the New Republic , Common Ground , Southwest Review , New Anvil , Coronet , and Mademoiselle . Also included in the subseries is correspondence with literary colleagues and organizations, young writers seeking advice and encouragement, and two manuscript repositories, the Western Historical Manuscript Collection at the University of Missouri, Columbia, and the Missouri Historical Society. Series II, Literary Productions , consists primarily of Fannie Cook's manuscripts towards her novels, poetry, short stories, essays, and articles whose themes generally reflect her involvement in contemporary political and social issues. Included in her papers are manuscripts for three of her published novels: Mrs. Palmer's Honey , Storm Against the Wall , and The Long Bridge . Manuscripts for several unpublished novels are also in the collection: Beyond the Clinic Window , My Father's Family and several sets of drafts for a novel about the 19th century U.S. Army surgeon William Beaumont, variously titled With Passion and With Pride , Great Ajax! , In Astor's Empire , and Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A . Her manuscripts include all stages of drafts from notes to the final version. Typescripts and carbon typescripts, with numerous autograph revisions and corrections, comprise the bulk of the material. Final versions for two of her novels, Mrs. Palmer's Honey and Storm Against the Wall , include the publisher's copy edited manuscript and galley proofs. The material has been arranged according to literary form and includes work for her novels, 62 short stories, 40 poems, 45 articles, 22 book reviews, and several editorials and radio scripts. Also among Fannie Cook's literary productions are autograph notes and typescript drafts for 23 speeches and six radio interviews. The radio interviews generally occurred following the publication of the author's novels. While some of the interviews were given from a prepared script, the papers show that frequently Fannie Cook worked from an outline or set of questions with autograph notes in the margins. Her speeches reflect her interest in education, literary and interracial issues, and include those delivered over the radio, at conventions, and before church and civic groups. Again, it appears she was comfortable working not only from a prepared text, but from note cards as well. Series III, Printed Material , contains ephemera, reports, periodicals, newsletters and newspaper clippings found among Fannie Cook's papers which support and document her interest and work in the community. A significant portion of the material refers to the sharecroppers and the issue of race relations in the community. Other items pertain to her literary career or are personal belongings such as her 1947-1948 engagement calendar or membership cards. To assist the researcher, brochures, flyers, memorandums, monographs, press releases, reports, periodicals and newsletters have been listed by title on the container list. Subject matter and dates of newspaper clippings are also listed. Series IV, Photographic Material , includes photographs and cartes de visite of Fannie Cook's relatives in Germany. Those that are identified include her paternal grandmother, Fannie von Beisenfeld Frank; her father, Julius Frank; two aunts, Bertha Frank Oppenheimer and Adeiheid Frank Lehman; and twin boys, Hans and Bernard Leienthal. The twins, Sons of Fannie Cook's cousin, Fannie Oppenheimer and her husband Kurt, were the children Fannie Cook was asked to secure affidavits for during World War II. Also in this series are two photographs of Fannie Cook posing with unidentified groups of St. Louis citizens, ca. 1948, and 17 photographs of the Friends Summer Work Camp at Cropperville in 1941. Series V is a collection of 11 scrapbooks whose individual themes reflect Fannie Cook's interest in writing, race relations, her community, her state, and the sharecroppers of southeast Missouri. Scrapbooks for each of these interests contain numerous clippings, brochures, programs, circulars and articles, either of events in which Fannie Cook participated (often as the featured speaker), or which provide information related to her special interests. Scrapbooks for each of the four novels published in her lifetime contain telegrams, letters, clippings and memorabilia pertaining to the publication of the book. Clippings and tear-sheets of Fannie Cook's early publications of short stories, poems, book reviews and letters to the editors are arranged in another scrapbook. Dates and titles of each book are listed in the container list of the register. Arrangement Series I. Correspondence , 1874-1884; 1909-1949. Boxes 1-18 This series is divided into four subseries: Family , General , Public Service , and Literary . Family Correspondence is the smallest of the subseries and is arranged chronologically. It contains letters from Fannie Cook's immediate family as well as those from relatives in Germany and the United States. Family legal documents and memorabilia are also filed in the subseries. General Correspondence contains letters of appreciation and congratulatory mail from friends and the public following publication of her novels. Additional correspondence pertains to the arrangements for numerous speaking engagements, both here in the St. Louis area and through-out the mid-west. Public Service Correspondence reflects Fannie Cook's involvement with numerous civic organizations and committees over a 25-year period. These files are arranged alphabetically by name of the committee or organization, with material within the files arranged chronologically. Organizational records, when available, have been kept with the correspondence. Literary Career Correspondence contains Fannie Cook's professional correspondence with literary agents, publishers, editors of magazines and journals, aspiring writers, literary colleagues, organizations, and manuscript repositories. The material has been arranged alphabetically by name of the agent/publisher/magazine, etc., with chronological arrangement within each file. Series II. Literary Productions . Boxes 19-28 Literary Productions is divided into four sub-series: Manuscripts , Speeches , Radio Interviews , and Research Notes/Outlines for Literary Productions . Manuscripts include work for several literary forms: novels (arranged chronologically by date of writing, if published, or date of publication); short stories (arranged alphabetically by title); articles/essays/ book reviews arranged alphabetically by title; editorials, radio scripts arrange chronologically by date of publication or date of broadcast; poetry arranged alphabetically by title; speeches and radio interviews arranged chronologically by date of presentation. Series III. Printed Material . Boxes 29-30 Printed Material is divided into seven subseries: Ephemera , Reports , Periodicals , Newsletters , Dramatization , Newspaper Clippings , and Rare Book . Ephemera is arranged chronologically according to format: appointment calendar, brochures, circulars, flyers, membership cards, memorandum, monographs, press releases, tear sheets, drawings, and programs. Reports are arranged alphabetically by author. Periodicals and Newsletters are arranged alphabetically by name, and Newspaper Clippings arranged chronologically according to subject matter. The Rare Book is Fannie Cook's copy of The North Georgia Gazette , and Winter Chronicle , 2d ed., London: John Murray, 1822. Series IV. Photographic Material . Box 30 (3 folders) Photographic Material includes photographs and cartes de visite of Fannie Cook's relatives in Germany. Not all are identified. Additional photographs are of Fannie Cook posing with two unidentified groups of St. Louis citizens, and a series of photographs of the Friends Summer Work Camp at Cropperville. Series V. Scrapbooks . Filed with scrapbooks Series V is a collection of 11 scrapbooks whose individual themes reflect Fannie Cook's interest in writing, race relations, her community, her state, and the sharecroppers of southeast Missouri. The container list provides titles and dates for each scrapbook. Series IV Addendum contains miscellaneous manuscripts and correspondence of Fannie Cook. Conditions Governing Access The collection is open for research use. Conditions Governing Use For permission to publish, quote from, or reproduce material in this collection, please contact the Archives Reference Desk at archives@mohistory.org . Copyright restrictions may apply. The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of copyright. Physical and Technical Requirements There are no physical or technical restrictions. Related Materials Copies of Fannie Cook's novels and selected publications may be found in the Missouri Historical Society's research library. Preferred Citation Fannie Frank Cook Papers, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis. This index is an alphabetical listing of individual, civic organizations, and committees referred to in the Fannie Cook Papers, as well as Fannie Cook's articles, novels, and short stories. After each entry follows the box and folder number(s) in the collection where the reference(s) can be found. A.A. Ahner (private detective agency, St. Louis, Missouri) (B10/F3) Abele, Ralph: (Eden Seminary) (B5/F7, 10, 11, 12; B7/F1, 2; B8/F2, 22) "After the Armistice" (B17/F25) Akins, Zoe (writer) (B18/F29) "Amelia Roman" (also "Take Amelia Romano") (B12/F9, 10, 12; B16/F17; B18/F28) American Civil Liberties Union, (New York, New York) (B2/F4; B5/F1; B10/F3) American Civil Liberties Union, (St. Louis) (B5/F1) American Friends Service Committee (B7/F1-7) American Friends Summer Work Camp (Cropperville) (B7/F1-4, 7, 11; B8/F2, 3, 23) American Theatre (St. Louis, Missouri), picketing of (B11/F3, 7, 8; B29/F4) "And That Was What He Thought" (B16/F29; B17/F25, 29) Ann Watkins, Inc. (literary agent) (B13/F1-10) Arrow Rock, Missouri (B26/F30) "Aunt Ellie's Passion" (B13/F7, 8; B16/F36) Authors' Guild of the Authors' League of America (New York) (B18/F23-25) Baasch, Hans H. (Manager of the FSA LaForge ProJect) (B5/F5; B6/F4; B7/F9, 15) Bagley, Lindell F. (B5/F1) Baldwin, Roger (B3/F15; B5/F1) Bartholomew, Harland (St. Louis City Planner) (B10/F26; B30/F21) [Beaumont] (reference to Fannie Cook's unpublishhed novel), also titled With Passion and with Pride ; Great Ajax! A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont U.S.A. ; In Astor's Empire (B2/F3, 4; B7/F3; B12/F17; B13/F2-7, 17; B14/F13, 15, 16; B19/F2-13; B20) [Beaumont] researcher, Alma Myer (B14/F15, 16) "Before the Swim" (B17/F25) Bernays Plan (campaign to improve civil liberties status of Negroes in St. Louis) (B9/F5, 24) "Beyond the Clinic Window" (B12/F3, 4, 5; B15/F1, 21; B16/F8; B17/F28) "Beyond the Hill of Her Daily Thoughts" (B16/F25; B17/F28, 35) Biggs, Fred J., Dr. (Cropperville) (B6/F10, 11; B7/F1, 2) "A Big Silent Man" (B12/F11) "Black Angels" (B12/F17, 18; B13/F1-4; B16/F17, 18) "Black Liberty" (B12/F6, 9; B14/F4, 5; B16/F4, 17; B17/F20, 24) Bliven, Bruce (Editor, New Republic ) (B17/F5, 6, 7) Board of Education, City of St. Louis (B10/F1) Boot-Heel Doctor (B3/F2; B7/F10; B12/F3, 4, 10, 12, 16; B13/F10, 14, 17; B14/F9-15; B15/F14; B16/F4; B30/F23; (Scrapbook #8)) (See also They Are My People (original title)) Boot-Heel Doctor (first book jacket) (B14/F9) Boot-Heel Doctor (second book jacket) (B14/F10) Bowles, Carrie King (B4/F1, 2; B8/F3; B10/F4; B16/F17; B18/F6) Boy Scouts of America, St. Louis Council (B2/F1; B4/F2; B5/F1) Buck, Pearl (B9/F9; B10/F18) Buder Park (B11/F7) Burgess, David, Reverend (Independent Tenants Committee for Delmo Homes) (B5/F14, 15; B6/F7) "The Business of Being a Bride" (B14/F8; B16/F29) Cally, Ann (Cropperville nurse) (B6/F11; B7/F4, 5; B8/F3) Campbell, Elmer Simms (St. Louis Black cartoon artist) (B10/F18) Citizens Civil Rights Committee (St. Louis, Missouri) (B9/F3, 4, 23; B11/F6) "Citizens of the Sky" (B13/F7, 17, 24; B16/F14, 27; B17/F9) City Hospital #2 (B4/F2, 6, 7) (See also Homer G. Phillips Hospital) Civil Liberties Committee of St. Louis (B2/F4; B5/F5) Clark, Bennett, U.S. Senator (B5/F11) Clark, John T. (Executive Secretary, Urban League of St. Louis) (See Urban League of St. Louis) Cochran, Louis (B18/F7) Coghlan, Ralph (Editor, St. Louis Post-Dispatch ) (B11/F1, 2) Committee of County High School for Negroes (B4/F4) Committee on Household Service Problems (B4/F1) Communist Party of Missouri (B29/F12) Communist Party of the United States (B29/F24) Community Chest for St. Louis and St. Louis County (B3/F3, 4) Conroy, Jack (writer) (B17/F3; B18/F8) Cook, Howard Frank (son) and Joanna (wife) (B1/F9, 10) Cook, Jerome, Dr. (husband of Fannie Cook) (B1/F5, 9; B13/F7, 8; B29/F16; B30/F5, 21) Cook, Robert Jerome (son) (B1/F5, 10) Cosmopolitan Choral Society (B3/F2; B11/F7) "Cousin Hugo" (B12/F5, 6, 7, 8, 10; B16/F19) "Cousin Oliver Said" (B12/F11, 12) Cropperville (Boxes 5, 6, 7) Cropperville bathhouse (B7/F3, 4; B8/F3) Cropperville clinic (B6/10; B7/F1, 2, 5, 7; B8/F2) Cropperville photographs (B14/F10) Cropperville school (B6/F12-14) Cropperville windmill (B6/F15; B7/F4; B8/F3, 4) Cropperville workcamp (See American Friends Summer Work Camp) Cropperville WPA library and nursery school (B7/F13) Dale, Elvira (president, Local 61, CIO, Earle, Arkansas) (B5/F6, 7, 12; B8/F2) Davidson, Jo (artist Ch. Independent Citizens' Com.) (B4/F16; B10/F10) Davison, Edward (Director, Writer's Conference of Colorado) (B18/F21, 22) "Dean of Our Second-Hand Men" (B12/F10; B17/F20) Delmo Labor Homes (B5/F14, 15; B6/F7; B8/F5; B11/F2; B29/F2, 25; B30/F14, 25; (Scrapbook #6)) Department of Race Relations of the Community Council of St. Louis (B4/F1-12) Dickerson, Pauline (Secretary and Acting Director, People's Art Center) (B10/F17, 18, 24) Dillard, Irving (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) (B5/F6; B11/F1, 2) Dodd, Mead, Company (publisher of Boot-Heel Doctor ) (B14/F9-18) Donnell, Forrest C. (Missouri Governor, Senator) (B5/F8, 13, 14) Doubleday & Company, Inc. (B14/F18-25) "Drama in the Artic" (B16/F15; B17/F3, 4) "A Dramatic Season in the Artic" (B16/F18, 35) Eden Theological Seminary (B5/F7, 10) Elias Michael School (B1/F17; B2/F4) "Emma's Divorce" (B13/F15, 16; B17/F28) Equal Rights Amendment (1934) (B1/F19, 20; B26/F2, 4, 14; B28/F4, 15) Ethical Society of St. Louis (B3/F2, 4, 5, 6, 14, 15; B30/F15) Eugene Field Society (B2/F2) Eulogy of Fannie Cook by Alexander Langsdorf (B18/F29) "Exodus of the Sharecroppers" (chant) (B12/F10; B17/F1) Fair Employment Practice Ordinance (St. Louis) (B9/F5, 9, 10, 21; B29/F5) Famous Barr Department Store (integration of lunch counter) (See Race Relations) Farm Security Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture (B5/F11, 15; B6/F2, 4; B7/F2, 3, 5, 7, 9-12, 15; B11/F2; B14/F11, 12; B17/F7; B29/F14, 26, 27, 28; B30/F24 (Scrapbook #4)) "Fathers are Phosphates" (B12/F16; B13/F4) "Federal Marriage" (B12/F11, 12) Fischer, William (President, Missouri Agriculture Workers Council) (B5/F3, 4-7, 9) Fisk University (regarding Rachel Stix Michael Scholarship) (B2/F1) Fitzpatrick, Daniel Robert (Cartoonist) (B18/F2) Foley, Martha (B12/F2, 8; B13/F7, 8; B14/F11; B17/F28; B18/F21) "For All Time" (B14/F8) Forest City Manufacturing Company strike (B10/F3; B29/F5) "For Young and Old" (B12/F3; B17/F34) Frank, J. William (Fannie Cook's brother) (B27/F12) Frank, Jacob (Fannie Cook's grandfather) (B1/F12) Frank, Jennie Michael (Fannie Cook's mother) (B1/F13, 14) Frank, Julius (Fannie Cook's father) (B1F1, 11, 13, 14, 16; B30/F29) Frank, Simon (Fannie Cook's brother) (B1/F4, 6, 7, 10; B5/F9, 17; B8/F1) Franklin School controversy (B4/F4, 5, 8; B28/F1, 2, 14; B29/F4) Freed, Mildred (writer) (B6/F1; B7/F14; B30/F2) "From Easel to Typewriter" (B13/F21; B17/F26) G.P. Putnam's Sons (publisher of The Hill Grows Steeper ) (B12/F15; B15/F3-13) Gaines, Lloyd (Petition for Mandamus) (B10/F15) Galston, Gottfried and Helen (B2/F6, 14; B29/F16a) Gasparotti, Elizabeth Seifert (writer) (B18/F2) Gellhorn, Edna Fischel (Mrs. George) (B2/F3, 11; B3/F1, 5, 8; B4/F1, 15; B5/F2; B8/F5; B9/F9; B11/F4; B14/F4; B18/F28) Gellhorn, Martha (B15/F8; B18/F28) George Washington Carver Award (Scrapbook #6) Goldbeck, Cecil (G.P. Putnam's Sons) (B14/F7; B15/F6, 8, 9) Gottlieb, Augusta (B2/F13) Green, Elizabeth (Director, People's Art Center) (B10/F17, 18, 19) "Gustav's Luck" (B13/F3, 4) Haack, Arno J. (President, Liberal Voters League, 1947) (B10/F10) Hall, Leonard (President, Liberal Voters League, 1944-1946) (B10/F10) Harris Teachers College (B10/F1) Hayti, Missouri (B5/F11) "He Had Ranked Third" (B12/F2; B16/F30, 31; B17/F25) "Helen of Troy" (B14/F8) Hellman, Lillian (writer) (B13/F2; B18/F9) Henderson, George Wylie (writer) (B18/F10) Herzog, Fred (B2/F3; B3/F7; B12/F14) The Hill Grows Steeper (B1/F23; B12/F3-13; B13/F9-10; B15/F4-9, 11-12, 16, 17; B30/F22; Scrapbook #7) The Hill Grows Steeper first bookjacket (B15/F5) "Holiday - Morning" (B12/F18; B13/F1; B16/F4; B17/F10) Homer G. Phillips Hospital (B14/F4; B24/F4) Hotels in St. Louis (segregation of) (B11/F4) "The House [Home] That Cannot Succeed" (B12/F8,10-12; B15/F22; B16/F10, 31, 38, 39; B17/F15, 32) (See also "Member of the Household") Howell, Bertha (Secretary, Department of Race Relations) (B4/F1-11) Hughes, E.L. (State President, UCAPAWA) (B5/F6,8-10; B6/F4; B7/F15) Hunter, Holland (American Friends Service Committee Cropperville) (B5/F9; B6/F15; B7/F2-4, 7, 8; B8/F3) Hunter, Holland, Journal kept at Cropperville (B7/F8) Hynd, J. Hutton (Minister, The Ethical Society of St. Louis) (B1/F24; B2/F1, 3, 6, 14; B3/F3, 4, 6, 7, 10) "I Chose Public Schools" (B16/F35) "I Have Promised Him Nothing" (B12/F12) "I Met A Floater" (B12/F10-12) Independent Citizens' Committee of the Arts, Sciences and Professions, Inc. (New York, New York) (B2/F6; B10/F10) "In Search of Heaven" (B12/F10) International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (Locals 181-182, St. Louis) (B10/F3; B29/F5) "Invisible Banner" (B12/F11; B16/F8, 25, 34; B17/F3) Isserman, Ferd (Rabbi, Temple Israel) (B1/F23; B3/F6; B29/F30) "Jennie Buys a Weapon" (B12/F3, 5, 6, 11, 12; B14/F4, 8; B16/F5, 8, 38; B17/F3, 25, 35) "Jim Brady's Paws" (B16/F35) Johnson, Josephine (Mrs. George Cannon) (writer) (B7/F1, 2, 4, 10; B8/F4, 6; B17/F5, 6; B18/F11, 14; B30/F27) Johnson, Walter (Cropperville camp leader) (B5/F3, 4, 5; B8/F1, 22) Karamu House (Cleveland, Ohio) (B6/F15) Kaufman, A.P. (Mayor of St. Louis) (B2/F13; B3/F13; B9/F7, 8; B11/F6, 7) A Kick From the Bootheel by [ ] McWilliams (B18/F20) "A Kid to Support" (B12/F16; B13/F3; B16/F4; B17/F18, 30) (See also "A Letter From Him") "A Killer's Knife Ain't Holy" (B13/F1, 2, 3; B16/F17) Kruger, Fania (writer) (B18/F12) LaForge Farms Project (B7/F9, 15; B11/F2) Langston University (Oklahoma) (B3/F11, 12, 13) Le Galliene, Eva (Director, The Civic Repertory Theatre, Inc.) (B13/F11) League of Struggle for Negro Rights (St. Louis, Missouri) (B4/F5) League of Women Voters of St. Louis (B10/F1-7; B28/F2; B30/F17) Lehman, Justin (cousin) (B1/F4, 5, 6, 10) "A Letter From Him" (B12/F10, 16, 18; B16/F38; B17/F25) (Revision of "A Kid to Support") Letters to the Editor (B11/F1, 2; Scrapbooks #2 & #6) Liberal Voters' League (St. Louis, Missouri) (B10/F8-14; B16/F14) Liebenthal, Curt and Fannie Oppenheimer (cousins) (B1/F5, 6, 8; B30/F29) Liebenthal, Hans and Bernard (twin sons of Curt and Fannie) (B1/F7; B30/F29) Lieber, Maxim (literary agent) (B2/F7; B13/F17-23) Lien, Arnold (Professor, Department of Political Science, Washington University) (B9/F11) "Life and Letters" (B14/F8) Lincoln University (Jefferson City, Missouri) (B1/F18; B2/F8, 9; B11/F8) Lock, Gregory J. (Minister, Poplar Bluff, Missouri) (B5/F4, 5; B6/F10; B7/F1) Lomask, Milton (writer) (B18/F14) The Long Bridge (B13/F21, 22; B16/F14; B23/F2-4) "Love Wears an Old Cloak" (B14/F8) Lunch counters (integration of) (B11/F2) (See Race Relations) "Maggie Defends Her Young" (B16/F38) "Mama Likes To Be Happy" (B13/F7, 8, 17, 18, 24; B17/F26; B18/F13) Manfred, Ernest Fred (writer) (B2/F7) "Many" (B16/F29; B17/F5) "A Marriageable Daughter" (B12/F3) Meissner, Edna (Mrs. Edwin B.) (B2/F12; B15/F7) Meissner, Edwin B. (B2/F6, 8; B3/F1; B5/F15; B9/F1-11, 13-19; B11/F5, 7) "Member of the Household" ("The Home That Cannot Succeed") (B17/F5, 34) Michael, Jennie (See Jennie Michael Frank) Michael, Elias (Fannie Cook's uncle) (B26/F32) Michael, Rachel Stix (Fannie Cook's aunt) (B26/F5, 28) Middlebush, Frederick A. (President, University of Missouri) (B7/F10; B18/F30) Miller, Edward R. (American Friends Service Committee) (B7/F15, 11) Missouri Agricultural Workers' Council (B6/F3, 4, 6; B7/F4) Missouri Citizens for Wallace (B4/F13) Missouri Historical Society (B18/F29; B27/F10) "The Missouri Okies Remained at Home" (B13/F1; B17/F5, 6) Missouri Society for Crippled Children (B1/F22; B2/F1) Mitchell, H.L. (Southern Tenant Farmers' Union) (B5/F1, 20; B6/F3; B11/F6; B29/F7) Mitchell, J.E. (Managing editor, The St. Louis Argus) (B11/F7) Monticello, College (Alton, Illinois) (B2/F13; B3/F1) Moon, Bucklin (Doubleday & Company, Inc.) (B13/F18; B14/F18-20) Mound City Medical Forum (B4/F2) "Mountains at Twilight" (B12/F17, 18; B16/F4) "Mrs. Crumps Repeats Herself" (B12/F3; B16/F36; B17/F25; B18/F22) Mrs. Palmer's Honey (B3/F2; B13/F13, 17, 18-23, 25; B17/F2; B18/F13; B21; Scrapbooks #8 & #9) "Munition Era" (B16/F40) "My Father's Family" (B12/F7, 11-16, 19; B15/F9, 10) Nagel, Charles, Jr. (President, People's Art Center Association) (B10/F17, 18) National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), St. Louis Chapter (B10/F15, 16) National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), St. Louis Chapter, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (B11/F4) National Committee to Aid Victims of German Fascism (B4/F14, 15) National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, Inc. (B18/F3, 4) National Council to Aid Agricultural Workers (B7/F14) National Urban League Exhibit of Negro Artists, 1946 (B10/F18; Scrapbook #6) National Wallace for President Committee (B4/F16,17) Negro Progressive Association (St. Louis County, Missouri) (B4/F3) "The Negro Woman's Contribution to American Life," by Carrie K. Bowles (B18/F6) "North Georgia Gazette" (B17/F8, 17) "Old Minnie" (B17/F25) Oppenheimer, Bertha Frank (Fannie Cook's aunt) (B1/F3, 5, 6; B30/F29) Oppenheimer, Monroe (Farm Security Administration, Office of the Solicitor) (B5/F1) Owen, Edgar (Cropperville resident) (B5/F1, 3, 5) "Owen Whitfield: A Profile" (B13/F2, 3, 4; B16/F18; B17/F4, 14) "Ozark Shadows" (B12/F10) Pen and Brush (National Literary Organization) (B18/F26) People's Art Center (B3/F7; B10/F17-28; Scrapbook #6; B27/F8) People's Institute of Applied Religion (B5/F8, 13; B29/F6) Permanent Council on Relief Needs (St. Louis, Missouri) (B4/F18) Petry, Ann (writer) (B18/F26) "Picnic-Living in Wartime" (B13/F4) Piney-Woods Country Life School (B11/F6) The Pioneers (St. Louis Literary Organization) (B18/F27) Ploeser, Walter C., U.S. Congressman, 12th District, St. Louis Missouri (B2/F4) Portugal, Ruth (Ann Watkins, Inc.) (B12/F10, 11, 16-19; B13/F17) "Presents From Uncle Herman" (B16/F17) "Pretty Phrases" (Play) (B15/F20) Progressive Citizens of America (B4/F19) Progressive Party of Missouri (B4/F20; B13/F21) Pruitt, Wendell O. (B9/F16, 17) Race Relations (B3/F4, 5; B4/F1-12, 17; B9/F1-25; B11/F4-8; B17/F7; B24/F4; B25/F26; B26/F16, 20, 29; B27/F5; B28/F1-3, 7, 9-11, 17-21; B29/F2, 4, 9, 24, 32; Scrapbooks #5 & #6) Readers Digest Award (B14/F1, 2; B15/F21; B16/F8; B17/F15; B18/F2) Redmond, Sidney R. (president, NAACP) (B10/F15) Rhoda, Bertha B. (Secretary, People's Art Center) (B10/F17, 18; B11/F6) Robeson, Paul (actor) (B4/F13, 16, 17, 19; B13/F21; B30/F27) Rockwood, Irene (Cropperville nurse) (B6/F10; B7/F7; B8/F2, 22, 24) Rombauer, Irma (B2/F2; B3/F16; B10/F19) Roosevelt, Eleanor (B6/F2; B12/F16; B14/F11; B17/F5) St. Louis American (B11/F7) St. Louis Argus (B11/F7; B29/F4) St. Louis Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons (B4/F21; B30/F17) St. Louis Committee for Fair Employment Practice Ordinance (B9/F10) St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of Sharecroppers (B58; B30/F8, 25) St. Louis Mercantile Library (B2/F4) St. Louis Post-Dispatch (B11/F1, 2) St. Louis Public Library (B2/F5, 6, 13, 14; B3/F1, 2, 10; B11/F1) St. Louis Race Relations Commission (B9/F121) St. Louis Star-Times (B3/F5; B11/F3) St. Louis Writers' Guild (B2/F9; B3/F2; B18/F4) "Sara's Brothers" (B12/F12; B16/F38) Sartre, Jean-Paul, article "The Situation of the Jew: Reflections on the Jewish Questions I & II" (B16/F16) Scarlett, William (Bishop of Missouri, Christ Church Cathedral) (B5/F1, 7, 15; B11/F4) "Seeds Without Soil" (B12/F18; B13/F1-3, 6; B16/F18) Seifert, Adele (writer) (B3/F7) Seifert, Elizabeth (See Elizabeth Seifert Gasparotti) Seifert, Shirley (writer) (B18/F2) Sentner, William (Vice President, United Electrical, Radio & Machine Workers of America, District Council Eight) (B2/F10; B9/F9-13, 15-19; B11/F6) "Sergeants and the City" (B16/F27; B17/F30) "Shadows in the Household" (B16/F26) Shady Oak Theater, segregation of (B11/F8) Sharecroppers (Boxes 5-8; B11/F1, 2; B17/F3, 4; B18/F20; B26/F8, 23, 24, 34; B27/F19, 31; B29/F3, 6, 10, 13, 26-28, 31, 34; B30/F2, 6, 21, 25; Scrapbook #4) "Sharing with a Nigger" (B13/F17, 24; B16/F27) Shelly Case (B11/F6, 7, 8) Sikeston, Missouri, lynching (B7/F11; B14/F15; B17/F7; B29/F4, 12, 32; B30/F24) "A Silly Man" (B12/F17) "The Sisters" (B16/F3, 7, 12, 29; B17/F5, 19, 23) Smith, Ann Ludlow (Editor, The Village Press) (B2/F8) Smith, Gerald L.K. (America First Committee) (B11/F7) Snow, Thad (writer) (B5/F2, 5, 6; B8/F2; B11/F1; B12/F17, 18; B29/F14; B30/F13, 24, 25; Scrapbook #4) "Sons in Khaki" (B13/F5, 6; B16/F26) Southern Tenant Farmers Union (B29/F7, 10, 33; Scrapbook #4) (See also H.L. Mitchell) Stark, Lloyd (Governor of Missouri) (B5/F3) "Stars Above the Desert" (B13/F7) Steward, John T. (Area Director, Southeast Missouri, FSA) (B7/F10) "Stop-Over Privileges Only" (B12/F12, 14, 15; B16/F22; B17/F28) Storm Against the Wall (B3/F6; B13/F21-23, 25; B22/F1-9; B23/F1; Scrapbook #11) Stowe Teachers College (B3/F13, 14) (See also Harris Teachers College) Sweet, Sidney-E. (Dean, Christ Church Cathedral) (B2/F4; B4/F4, 6) "Tea For Me" (B12/F17, 18) Thalinger, Thelma Wiles (Mrs. Oscar), (Treasurer, St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of Sharecroppers) (B8/F16) They Are My People (original title for Boot-Heel Doctor ) (B12/F16-18; B13/F1-4) "They Live Forever" (B17/F25) "This Man Shorty" (B12/F10; B17/F25) "Thomas Wolf's Wife" (B13/F7; B16/F36) Todd, Helen (writer) (B13/F8; B18/F17-19) "Tom Cartright's Wife" (B14/F8) Trent, Lucia (B18/F2, 3) "The Triumphant Touch" (B13/F17, 18; B16/F36) Truman, Harry S. (B3/F1; B5/F11, 14) Turner, Lilly (Federated Press) (B14/F1; B15/F1, 2) "Twinges" (B12/F3, 4, 7, 8; B14/F4) "Uncle Oliver Said So" (B16/F38) Unitarian Liberal Club (University of Missouri) (B3/F4, 5) United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing and Allied Workers of America (UCAPAWA) (B5/F9; B7/F14; B29/F13, 34, 35) University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri, 1915 graduation program (B29/F17) University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri, 1939 reunion speech (B28/F6) University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri, race relations (B3/F4, 5, 10) University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri, School of Journalism (B18/F4) University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri, Western Historical Manuscript Collection (B18/F30) Urban League of St. Louis (B2/F8; B4/F1-4; B5/F15; B7/F15; B8/F3; B11/F5, 6, 8; B28/F8; B29/F11; B30/F10) Usher, Roland (professor) (B5/F11; B7/F12; B8/F2; B11/F2) Van Ravenswaay, Charles (Director, Missouri Historical Society) (B10/F19; B18/F29) Vaughn, George L. (lawyer in Shelley vs. Kraemer Case) (B11/F6, 7, 8) "Verses by a Little Dog" (B16/F33) The Ville (B2/F10) Wallace, Henry (B2/F12, 13, 14; B3/F1; B4/F13, 16, 17, 20; B26/F40; B30/F27) Wallace, Henry, Mrs. (B3/F9; Scrapbook #6) Wallhausen, Art (Editor/publisher, The Charleston Enterprise-Courier) (B11/F1) Warren, Robert Penn (Managing Editor, The Southern Review) (B15/F14; B17/F25) Washington University (B3/F7; B4/F11; B11/F8; B29/F2; Scrapbook #6) "We Formed a Committee" (B13/F1-3) Weir, Marian (Mrs. W. Victor) (Chairman, St. Louis Consumer Federation) (B10/F3; B2/F10) Wesley House (St. Louis settlement house) (B4/F5) West Virginia State College (B3/F11-14) Western Historical Manuscript Collection (See University of Missouri, Western Historical Manuscript Collection) "Whatever Comes" (B12/F3, 10; B16/F35) "What Is a Woman" (B16/F28) "What! No Maids?" (B17/F15) "What's Wrong with the Relationship" (B12/F18) Wheeler, Henry Winfield (The St. Louis American) (B11/F7, 8; B18/F3, 4) Whitfield, Owen (Vice-President, UCAPAWA, and leader of sharecroppers) (B5/F19; B6/F3-9; B7/F1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15; B8/F2, 24; B17/F5; B28/F8; B29/F6, 13-15, 34) Whitfield, Zella (Mrs. Owen) (B5/F4, 5, 11-14, 16-18; B6/F5, 11, 14; B7/F7; B17/F5; B29/F34) "The Widow Levi" (B13/F15; B14/F4) Wilkens, Roy (NAACP Legal Fund - Assistant Secretary) (B11/F4) Williams, Sidney (Executive Secretary, The Urban League of Cleveland) (B2/F7, 10, 13, 14; B5/F6; B7/F15; B11/F8; B14/F4) Wilson, Margaret Bush (Vice-Chairman of The Progressive Party of Missouri) (B4/F20) "With Orchids On My Shoulder" (B13/F7, 24) Wolfe, Thomas (writer) (B18/F12, 21) "A Woman About Town" (B12/F3, 5, 6; B14/F4, 5; B15/F15; B17/F28) "A Woman's Fear of Cancer" (B12/F7, 11) Women's Issues (B26/F37, 41, 42) (See also Equal Rights Amendment and Forest City Manufacturing Company strike) "A Wonderful Woman" (Play) (B14/F8) Works Progress Administration (WPA) (B7/F13) Works Progress Administration (WPA), Federal Writers Project (B18/F28) Works Progress Administration (WPA), script for radio program titled "WPA Prints" (B27/F7) Wright, Cleo (See Sikeston, Missouri, Lynching) The Writers' Conference in the Rocky Mountains-University of Colorado (B18/F12, 21) Writers' War Board (B11/F5; B13/F7; B18/F3) Writers War Committee (B2/F4) Yarborough, Emmett (Cropperville Camp secretary) (B5/F8, 9, 11) Yarrow, Clarence and Margaret (Directors, AFS summer work camp - Cropperville) (B7/F1-5, 7; B8/F2, 4, 24) "Yaas'm" (B16/F40) Zimmerman, Orville (U.S. Congressman, Missouri 10th District) (B5/F1; B6/F7) "Zorella's Hat Goes To The White House" (B12/F15-17; B16/F38; B17/F5) African Americans -- Missouri American fiction -- Women authors American poetry -- Women authors Civic leaders -- Missouri -- Saint Louis Sharecroppers -- Missouri -- Bootheel Region Short stories, American Women authors, American -- 20th century Women social reformers -- United States Series I: Correspondence Sub-Series A: Family Correspondence 1874-1884; 1909-1949 Correspondence Correspondence. 1896 July 1 1 Correspondence. 1914; 1919 1 2 Correspondence. 1935 1 3 Correspondence. 1937 Feb 1 4 Correspondence. 1938 1 5 Correspondence. 1939 Jan-Aug 1 6 Correspondence. 1940 June-Oct 1 7 Correspondence. 1941 Mar-June 1 8 Correspondence. 1943 Feb; 1945 June; 1946 Feb-Apr 1 9 Correspondence. 1948 Mar-Nov; 1949 Jan 1 10 Family Legal Documents (Julius Frank) Certificate. 1874 Apr 20 1 11 Certificate of Residency. 1876 Oct 24 1 11 Military Pass. 1878 1 11 Pass Port. 1883 Sep 30 1 11 Family Legal Documents (Jacob Frank) Testament. 1887 Mar 19 1 12 Family Memorabilia Invitation to wedding of Jennie Michael and Julius Frank. 1884 Mar 24 1 13 Tribute to Julius and Jennie Frank on the occasion of their 25th wedding anniversary. (carbon typescript) 1909 Mar 24 1 14 Newspaper clipping regarding wedding of Henrietta Epstein and Mose Cook. no date 1 15 Autograph book of Henrietta Epstein. 1877-1888 1 15 List of relatives. (holograph) no date 1 16 Obituary of Julius Frank. 1917 1 16 Sub-Series B: General Correspondence 1925-1949 Correspondence. 1925-1928 1 17 Correspondence. 1932; 1933 1 18 Correspondence. 1934 May-Dec 1 19 Correspondence. 1935 Apr-May 1 20 Correspondence. 1936 Jan-Oct; 1937 Jan, Nov 1 21 Correspondence. 1938 May-Aug 1 22 Correspondence. 1938 Sept-Oct 1 23 Correspondence. 1938 Nov-Dec 1 24 Correspondence. [1938] 1 25 Correspondence. 1939 2 1 Correspondence. 1940 Jan-May 2 2 Correspondence. 1941 2 3 Correspondence. 1942 Jan-Sept 2 4 Correspondence. 1943 Apr-Dec; 1944 2 5 Correspondence. 1945 Jan-June 2 6 Correspondence. [1945 June] 2 7 Correspondence. 1946 Jan-Feb 2 8 Correspondence. 1946 Mar 2 9 Correspondence. 1946 Apr 2 10 Correspondence. 1946 May 2 11 Correspondence. 1946 June-July 2 12 Correspondence. 1946 Aug-Oct 2 13 Correspondence. 1946 Nov-Dec 2 14 Correspondence. 1947 Jan-Mar 3 1 Correspondence. 1947 Apr-June 3 2 Correspondence. 1947 July-Sept 3 3 Correspondence. 1947 Oct-Dec 3 4 Correspondence. 1948 Jan-Feb 3 5 Correspondence. 1948 Mar 3 6 Correspondence. 1948 Apr 3 7 Correspondence. 1948 May 3 8 Correspondence. 1948 June 3 9 Correspondence. 1948 July-Sept 3 10 Correspondence. 1948 Oct 3 11 Correspondence. 1948 Nov 3 12 Correspondence. 1948 Dec 3 13 Correspondence. 1949 Jan-Apr 3 14 Correspondence. 1949 May-Aug 3 15 Correspondence. no date 3 16 Sub-Series C: Public Service Correspondence 1923-1949 Sub-Sub Series 1: Committees Committee on Household Service Problems (Urban League) Correspondence. 1933 Sept-Nov 4 1 Department of Race Relations of the Community Council of St. Louis. Correspondence. 1930 4 2 Correspondence. 1931 4 3 Correspondence. 1932 4 4 Correspondence. 1934 4 5 Minutes. 1930; 1931; 1933 4 6 Executive Committee Minutes, 1930, 1931; Docket for Meeting, 1934 Sept 12. 1930-1934 4 7 Minutes of Committee appointed to Study use of Franklin School. 1931 Dec-1932 Jan 4 8 Minutes of Committee on County High School for Negroes. 1931 Jan-Mar 4 9 Minutes of Committee on Training Course for Colored Social Workers. 1931 Dec 11 4 10 “Report of Classes for Negro Social Workers 1926-1934.” 1934 June 4 4 11 Report: “Facts and Figures for Speakers on Race Relations Compiled by the Department of Race Relations St. Louis Community Council.” 1934 Sept 4 12 Missouri Citizens for Wallace Correspondence. 1948 Jan-Mar 4 13 National Committee to Aid Victims of German Fascism Correspondence. 1933 Oct-Dec 4 14 Correspondence. 1934; 1935 Mar 4 15 National Wallace for President Committee Correspondence. 1948 Jan 4 16 Correspondence (Resolutions). 1948 Apr-July 4 17 Permanent Council on Relief Needs Correspondence. 1935 Dec-1936 Jan 4 18 Progressive Citizens of America (Missouri Office; St. Louis Chapter) Correspondence. 1947 Mar 4 19 Progressive Party of Missouri Correspondence. 1948 Jan-June; [1948] 4 20 St. Louis Citizen's Committee on Displaced Persons Correspondence. 1947 June-Dec; [1948 Aug/Sep]; 1949 July 4 21 St. Louis Committee for the Rehabilitation of Sharecroppers General Correspondence Correspondence. 1939 Jan-Feb 5 1 Correspondence. 1939 Mar-Apr 5 2 Correspondence. 1939 June-Dec 5 3 Correspondence. 1940 Jan-June 5 4 Correspondence. 1940 July-Dec 5 5 Correspondence. 1941 Jan-Apr 5 6 Correspondence. 1941 May-Dec 5 7 Correspondence. 1942 Jan-May 5 8 Correspondence. 1942 June-Dec 5 9 Correspondence. 1943 Jan-Mar 5 10 Correspondence. 1943 Apr-May 5 11 Correspondence. 1943 June-Dec 5 12 Correspondence. 1944 Jan-May 5 13 Correspondence. 1945 Jan-Apr 5 14 Correspondence. 1945 May-Dec 5 15 Correspondence. 1946 5 16 Correspondence. 1947 Jan-Apr 5 17 Correspondence. 1948 Jan-May 5 18 Correspondence. 1949 Jan-Apr 5 19 Correspondence. no date 5 20 Notes. no date 5 21 Correspondence with Individuals Freed, Mildred. 1939 6 1 Roosevelt, Eleanor. 1938 Nov; 1939-1942 6 2 Whitfield, Owen. 1939 6 3 Whitfield, Owen. 1940-1942 6 4 Whitfield, Owen. 1943 6 5 Whitfield, Owen. 1944 6 6 Whitfield, Owen. 1945 6 7 Whitfield, Owen. 1947 Mar-Oct; 1948 June 6 8 Whitfield, Owen. 1949 Jan-Mar 6 9 Correspondence Regarding Cropperville Projects Clinic. 1941 6 10 Clinic. 1942-1943 6 11 Grade School. 1939 Oct-1940 Sept 6 12 Grade School. 1941 Mar 6 13 Grade School. 1945 Apr-Nov; 1947 Jan-May 6 14 Windmill. 1942 July-Nov 6 15 Letters/Drawings from Cropperville Children. 1942 6 16-19 Correspondence with Organizations American Friends Service Committee Correspondence. 1941 June-Dec 7 2 Correspondence. 1940 Nov-1941 May 7 1 Correspondence. 1942 Jan-June 7 3 Correspondence. 1942 July-Dec 7 4 Correspondence. 1943 7 5 Correspondence. 1947 7 6 Report: “Report on Cropperville,” by the 1941 Summer Work Camp of the American Friends Service Committee at the Sharecropper Camp near Harviell, Missouri. 1941 7 7 "Journal Kept by Holland Hunter at Cropperville Work Camp - June 24th to Aug. 23rd, 1941." 1941 7 8 Farm Security Administration (FSA), United States Department of Agriculture Correspondence. 1940 July-Sep 7 9 Correspondence. 1941 7 10 Correspondence. 1942 7 11 Correspondence. 1943 Jan-July 7 12 Federal Works Agency Works Projects Administration (WPA) Correspondence. 1941; 1942 7 13 National Council to Aid Agricultural Workers Correspondence. 1939-1940 7 14 The Urban League of St. Louis Correspondence. 1939 Jan; 1940 Jan, Dec 7 15 Correspondence. 1942 May-Jun; 1945 Apr-May; 1946 May-Oct 7 16 Summary of State Unemployment Compensation Office Problem, May 8, 1946 Financial Correspondence Correspondence. 1939-1940 8 1 Correspondence. 1941 8 2 Correspondence. 1942 8 3 Correspondence. 1943 Jan-Apr; 1944 Apr-Dec 8 4 Correspondence. 1945 Nov-1946 Mar; 1947 Nov 8 5 Correspondence/Notes. no date 8 6 Minutes Minutes. 1939 Jan; Oct 8 7 Minutes (Committee of Writers). 1940 Mar 8 8 Minutes. 1940 Jul, Nov 8 9 Minutes. 1941 8 10 Minutes. 1942 8 11 Minutes. 1943 Jan; Feb; Jun; Jul; Dec 8 12 Minutes. 1944 Sept 8 13 Minutes. 1945 Mar; Apr; June; Oct 8 14 Minutes. 1948 June 8 15 Minutes (Final meeting). 1949 Feb 8 16 Other Membership list. 1939(?); 1940; 1941 8 17 Legal Documents: Articles of Incorporation of Missouri Co-operative Rehabilitation Association. (unsigned carbon typescript) 1939 8 18 By-laws. 1940 July 26 8 19 Camp-Rules, Laws and Regulations. (holograph) 1939(?) 8 20 Revised Laws for Governing Cropperville Camp. (typescript draft and typescript mimeographs) 1944 Sept 8 21 Financial Documents Bills. 1940-1941; no date 8 22 Bills (Friends Work Camp). 1940-1941 8 23 Receipts. 1939; 1940; 1941 8 24 Bank Statements (Mercantile Commerce Bank and Trust Company-Checking Account). 1939 Nov-1940 May 8 25 Bank Statements (Mercantile Commerce Bank and Trust Company Savings Account). 1942 Nov 8 26 Mercantile Commerce Bank and Trust Company checkbook and pass book. 1939 Nov-1940 Apr 8 27 Cancelled Checks (Webster Groves Trust Company and Clayton National Bank). 1941 Nov-1942 Aug 8 28 Treasurer's Record Book. 1939 Nov-1942 Jan 8 29 St. Louis Race Relations Commission Statement of Purpose Statement. 1944 June 9 1 Executive and Committee Personnel Correspondence. [1944] 9 2 Executive Committee Correspondence Correspondence (Notice of Meetings). 1944 Jan-Oct 9 3 Correspondence. 1945 Mar-June 9 4 Correspondence. 1945 Aug-Dec 9 5 Correspondence. 1946 Jan-Sept 9 6 General Correspondence Correspondence. 1943 Aug-Dec 9 7 Correspondence. 1944 9 8 Correspondence. 1945 9 9 Correspondence. 1946-1947 Feb 9 10 Public Relations Committee Correspondence. 1944 9 11 Correspondence - "Bulletin." 1944 Dec 9 12 Correspondence - Drafts of articles for "Bulletin." 1945 Jan-Oct 9 13 Progress Report "Progress Report for 1945." 1946 Jan 9 14 Minutes Minutes/Progress Reports of sub-committees. 1944 Mar-June 9 15 Minutes/Progress Reports of sub-committees. 1944 July-Nov 9 16 Minutes/Progress Reports of sub-committees. 1945 Jan-June 9 17 Minutes. 1945 July-Dec 9 18 Minutes. 1946 Jan-June 9 19 "Excerpt from Minutes of the Executive Committee regarding Committee Work of the Commission." (holograph draft and typescript) 1944 9 20 Reports Draft Brief in Support of a Fair Employment Practice Ordinance, St. Louis, Missouri, by sub-committee of the St. Louis Race Relations Committee. 1946 Jan 9 21 "The United States Cartridge Company and Colored Employees." (Fannie Cook drawings/annotations in margins) 1943 July 9 22 "Statement by Citizens Civil Rights Committee regarding Dispute with Department Stores relative to ban of Negro Customers at Lunch Counters." [1944] 9 23 Statement of the Citizens Civil Rights Committee, 1944 "The Bernays Plan." [1945] 9 24 "Preface to Proposed Survey of Race Prejudice and Opinion Patterns in St. Louis." (Fannie Cook drawings in margins) [1945/1946] 9 25 Sub-Sub-Series 2: Organizations League of Women Voters of St. Louis Correspondence Correspondence. 1923 Mar; 1924 Nov; 1925 10 1 Correspondence. 1927 Oct-1928 Oct; 1929 Feb 10 2 Correspondence. 1935 Jan-June; no date 10 3 Other Education Committee Minutes. 1927 Oct; 1928 May-June 10 4 "The 1924-1925 Report of the Public Schools Committee"; "Public Schools Committee Report", 1925 Nov; "1927-28 Report of the Education Committee of the LMV"; “We Come of Age” (report of the annual meeting of the St. Louis League of Women Voters), 1941 May 27. 1924-1941 May 27 10 5 City Planning Commission Dispute. Notes/Draft for Letter to St. Louisans/ Resolution. 1937 Nov 10 6 Report of 1938 Convention Briefs. 1938 10 7 Liberal Voters League Statement of Policy Program of the Liberal Voters League of St. Louis. 1947 Feb 10 8 Address List. ca. 1945 10 9 Correspondence. 1945-1947; 1948 Jan 10 10 Political Action Committee. 1944 10 11 Minutes. 1946 Feb-Apr 10 12 Bulletin. 1945 Jan; 1946 Apr 10 13 Newsletter: The Liberal Voter . 1946 Nov 10 14 National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Correspondence. 1936 Jan; 1942 Sep, Dec; 1943 Jan 10 15 Correspondence, List of Officers of St. Louis Branch, NAACP. 1946; 1948 Dec 10 16 People's Art Center Correspondence Correspondence. 1943-1944 10 17 Correspondence. 1945-1946 10 18 Correspondence. 1947 10 19 Correspondence. 1948-1949 10 20 By-Laws By-Laws. 1943 Sept 10 21 Minutes Minutes. 1944 10 22 Minutes. 1945; 1946 Jan; 1948 Mar, June 10 23 Executive Committee Minutes. 1946 Mar 10 24 Reports Director's Report. 1944 Feb, May; 1945 Jan-Sep; 1946 Apr; 1948 Jan 10 25 Annual Report. 1945 (for 1944); 1946; 1948 10 26 Miscellaneous Reports. 1943-1948 10 27 Printed Programs/Flyers Programs/Flyers. 1945-1948 10 28 Sub-Sub-Series 3: Letters to the Editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch Letters to the Editor. 1935; 1937; 1939; 1941 11 1 Letters to the Editor. 1942-1945; 1947(?); 1949 11 2 St. Louis Star-Times Letters to the Editor. 1941; 1942; 1945; 1946 11 3 Sub-Sub-Series 4: Race Relations Correspondence. 1943 11 4 Correspondence. 1944 11 5 Correspondence. 1945 11 6 Correspondence. 1946 11 7 Correspondence. 1947-1948; no date 11 8 Sub-Series D: Literary Career Correspondence 1920-1949 Sub-Sub-Series 1: Literary Agents Adeline M. Alvord Correspondence. 1938 Mar 23 12 1 Ann Watkins, Inc. Correspondence. 1935 Oct-Nov 12 2 Correspondence. 1937 Apr-July 12 3 Correspondence. 1937 Aug-Dec 12 4 Correspondence. 1938 Jan-Mar 12 5 Correspondence. 1938 Apr-May 12 6 Correspondence. 1938 June-July 12 7 Correspondence. 1938 Aug-Oct 12 8 Correspondence. 1938 Nov-Dec 12 9 Correspondence. 1939 Jan-Mar 12 10 Correspondence. 1939 Apr-June 12 11 Correspondence. 1939 July-Sept 12 12 Correspondence. 1939 Nov-Dec 12 13 Correspondence. 1940 Jan-Feb 12 14 Correspondence. 1940 Apr-June 12 15 Correspondence. 1940 July-Sept 12 16 Correspondence. 1940 Oct-Dec 12 17 Correspondence. 1941 Jan-Mar 12 18 Correspondence. 1941 Apr-June 13 1 Correspondence. 1941 July-Sept 13 2 Correspondence. 1941 Oct-Dec 13 3 Correspondence. 1942 Jan-Mar 13 4 Correspondence. 1942 Apr-Aug 13 5 Correspondence. 1942 Sept-Dec 13 6 Correspondence. 1943 13 7 Correspondence. 1944 Jan-June 13 8 Correspondence regarding royalty statements. 1938 Aug-1940 13 9 Correspondence regarding royalty statements. 1941 Apr-1944 May 13 10 The Civic Repertory Theatre, Inc. Correspondence. 1932 Nov-Dec 13 11 Donald MacCampbell Correspondence. 1942 Mar 13 12 John McCormick, Inc., Agency Correspondence. 1946 Jan 22 13 13 M. Bernice Wheeler Correspondence. 1941 Sept-Dec 13 14 Margaret C. Christie Correspondence. 1931 Dec-1933 13 15 Mathilde Weil. The Writers Workshop, Inc. Correspondence. 1931 Aug-1932 Feb 13 16 Maxim Lieber Correspondence. 1944 Mar-June 13 17 Correspondence. 1944 July-Dec 13 18 Correspondence. 1945 Jan-Feb 13 19 Correspondence. 1946 Aug-Sept; 1947 Dec (?) 13 20 Correspondence. 1948 13 21 Correspondence. 1949 Jan-Aug 13 22 Correspondence regarding royalty statements. 1946 July-1949 Apr 13 23 Music Corporation of America Correspondence. 1944 Feb-Mar 13 24 Pearn, Pollinger & Higham, Ltd. Correspondence. 1948 Feb-1949 May 13 25 Seven Arts Guild Correspondence. 1935 May-June 13 26 Sub-Sub-Series 2: Publishers Bobbs-Merril Company, The Correspondence. 1936 Oct 14 1 Carlyle Straub Publisher Correspondence. 1936 June 14 2 Chapman & Grimes, Publishers Correspondence. 1936 Oct 14 3 Charles Scribner's Sons. Correspondence. 1931 Oct-Nov; 1937 14 4 Correspondence. 1938 14 5 Covici, Friede, Inc. Correspondence. 1937 Sept 14 6 Coward McCann, Inc. Correspondence. 1941 Mar-Apr 14 7 Curtis Brown, Ltd. Correspondence. 1922 Dec-1923 Apr; 1925 May; 1926 June; 1929 Aug; 1933 Sept; 1936 Feb-July 14 8 Dodd, Mead & Company. Correspondence 1941 May-June 14 9 Correspondence 1941 July 14 10 Correspondence 1941 Aug 14 11 Correspondence 1941 Sept 14 12 Correspondence 1941 Oct-Nov 14 13 Correspondence 1941 Dec 14 14 Correspondence 1942 14 15 Correspondence 1943 14 16 Royalty Statements 1941 Sept-1943 Feb 14 17 Doubleday & Company, Inc. Correspondence with Bucklin Moon Correspondence 1945 Feb; 1946 Apr-July 14 18 Correspondence 1947 Oct-1948 14 19 Correspondence 1949 14 20 Correspondence 1946 14 21 Correspondence 1947 14 22 Correspondence 1948 14 23 Correspondence 1949 14 24 Royalty Statements 1946 June-Nov 14 25 Duell & Company, Inc./Duell, Sloan & Pearce, Inc. Correspondence. 1939 July; 1939 Oct; 1942 Aug 14 26 Federated Press, The. Correspondence. 1936 May-Oct 15 1 Correspondence. 1936 Nov-1937 Apr 15 2 G.P. Putnam's Sons. Memorandum of Agreement. 1938 Apr 11 15 3 Correspondence. Includes list of Fannie Cook's friends. 1938 Apr-May 15 4 Correspondence. Includes first book jacket. 1938 June 15 5 Correspondence. 1938 July-Aug 14 15 6 Correspondence. 1938 Aug 14 15 7 Correspondence. 1938 Aug 15-Dec 15 8 Correspondence. 1939 Jan 15 9 Correspondence. 1940 15 10 Correspondence. 1942 Apr-May 15 11 Royalty Statements. 1938 Sept-1939 Aug; 1940 Apr; 1942 Apr 15 12 Dinner Program/Newsletter. 1938 Oct-Nov 15 13 Houghton Mifflin Company Correspondence. 1939 Apr; 1940 Oct-Nov 15 14 Little, Brown and Company Correspondence. 1936 Dec-1937 15 15 Macmillan Company, The Correspondence. 1937 Nov-1938 Jan 15 16 NEA Service, Inc. Correspondence. 1938 Sept 15 17 New Fiction Publishing Corporation Correspondence. 1924 Mar 15 18 Pulse Publishing Company Correspondence. 1946 May 15 19 Samuel French Correspondence. 1933 Oct 15 20 Simon and Schuster, Inc. Correspondence. 1936 Sept-Oct 15 21 Survey Associates, Incorporated Correspondence. 1939 Dec-1940 Feb 15 22 Sub-Sub-Series 3: Publications Fannie Cook's Address List of Magazines Publishing Short Stories. 1931-1932 16 1 Fannie Cook's Record of Submission/Rejection/Publication of Articles and Short Stories. 1932 July-1940 Feb 16 2 All's Well . 1921 June; 1924 Apr 16 3 The American Magazine . 1937 Nov-1941 Oct 16 4 American Prefaces . 1937 Aug-Nov 16 5 The Anvil . no date 16 6 Apropos . 1921 Oct 27 16 7 The Atlantic Monthly . 1936 May-Nov; 1937 Mar-Apr; 1943 Feb 16 8 Better Verse . 1933 Oct 19 16 9 Binet Review . 1940 May 24 16 10 The Bookman . 1931 Nov 2 16 11 Brief Stories . 1921 Apr-June 16 12 Brown & Bigelow . no date 16 13 Collier's . 1937 Nov; 1943 July; 1944 Apr; 1945 Jan; 1949 Mar 16 14 The Colophon . 1937 Dec-1938 Mar 16 15 Commentary . 1948 Apr-July 16 16 Common Ground . 1941 16 17 Common Ground . 1942; 1943 May-June; 1944 Feb 8 16 18 Coronet . 1938 Oct; 1944 Jan; no date 16 19 Esquire . no date 16 20 Fantasy . 1937 Nov 16 21 The Farmer's Wife . 1937 Apr 5 16 22 The Fight . 1938 Mar-May 16 23 Fight Against War and Fascism . 1934 Nov 2 16 24 Frontier and Midland . 1937 16 25 Good Housekeeping . 1939 Jan; 1941 Feb-Mar; 1942 June 16 26 Harper's Bazaar . 1943 Mar; 1944 Jan 16 27 Harper's Magazine . 1925 Apr; 1927 Apr; 1931 Mar; 1937 Feb-1938; 1941; 1943 Jan 16 28 Hearst's Magazine . 1921 Mar 16 29 The Household Magazine . 1936 June 24 16 30 Hygeia . 1936 Sept; 1940 Apr 16 31 Independent Woman . 1937 Mar 16 32 Judge . 1921 June, Nov 16 33 Kansas State College . 1937 Nov 10 16 34 Ladies Home Journal . 1931 Oct; 1932 June; 1936 June-Nov; 1937 Nov-Dec 16 35 Mademoiselle . 1937 Nov-Dec; 1943 July-1944 May 16 36 Man . 1935 Jan 16 37 McCall's Magazine . 1939 Apr-1940 Jan; 1941 Feb 16 38 Mental Hygiene . 1940 Sept 16 39 The Monthly Review . 1934 Oct; 1935 Feb 16 40 The Nation . 1939 Jan-Mar; 1943 Mar-Apr 17 1 Negro Digest . 1948 Jan 30 17 2 The New Anvil . 1939 Jan-Oct; 1940 Sept; 1941 Feb-June 17 3 New Masses . 1934 Nov; 1936 Apr-June; 1942 May-June; 1943 May; no date 17 4 The New Republic . 1921 Apr; 1922 Dec; 1935 Sept; 1938 Feb; 1940 Nov-1941 June 17 5 The New Republic . 1941 July-Dec 17 6 The New Republic . 1942-1944 June 17 7 New York Times Magazine Section . 1935 Aug 18 17 8 The New Yorker . 1943 Feb-Aug 17 9 The Parent's Magazine . 1939 Aug; 1941 May 17 10 Partisan Review . 1936 Mar 18 17 11 Pearson's Magazine . 1924 Jan 30 17 12 Pictorial Review . 1932 June 16 17 13 The Protestant . 1943 Jan 6 17 14 Reader's Digest . 1936 Apr-1937 Feb 17 15 Reader's Digest . 1938 Apr-Aug; 1939 Sept; 1940 June; 1943 Apr 17 16 Reading and Collecting . 1937 Nov 17 17 Redbook . 1937 Mar 25; 1941 May 19 17 18 Reedy's Mirror . 1920 Sept 15 17 19 The Saturday Evening Post . 1937 Nov; 1939 Jan 17 20 The Saturday Review of Literature . 1942 Jan, July 17 21 School and Community . 1932 Aug 22 17 22 The Smart Set . 1921 Apr 11 17 23 Social Work Today . 1939 Jan-Feb 17 24 The Southern Review . 1935 Aug-Nov; 1936 July-Dec; 1937 Sept-1938; 1940 Apr 17 25 Southwest Review . 1946 Aug; 1948 Oct; 1949 May 17 26 The Spinners . 1935 July 22 17 27 Story . 1935 Oct; 1936 May-1937; 1938 Apr; 1940 June; 1941 Feb-June 17 28 Theater Guild Magazine . 1931 Aug 17 29 This Week . 1940 Sept 17 30 Tomorrow . 1943 July 17 31 The Training School Bulletin . 1940 July-Aug 17 32 The Village Press . 1935 Mar 5 17 33 The Woman Today . 1936 June-Oct 17 34 Woman's Home Companion 1936 May-1937 Jan; 1941 Feb 17 35 Woman's World . 1939 May 17 36 Writer's Forum . 1941 Mar 8 17 37 Unidentified. 1923; 1931; 1933; no date 17 38 Sub-Sub-Series 4: Aspiring Writers General Correspondence. 1937 Dec-1938; 1939 Mar 18 1 General Correspondence. 1940-1941 18 2 General Correspondence. 1942 Jan; 1944-1946 18 3 General Correspondence. 1947 Jan-1948 Nov; no date 18 4 Sub-Sub-Series 5: Literary Colleagues Baasch, Synnove. 1941 May-Dec 18 5 Bowles, Carrie King. 1932; 1941 Feb; no date 18 6 Cochran, Louis. 1939 Feb-1941 Feb 18 7 Conroy, Jack. 1945 June-1947 Nov; 1948 Mar-Apr; 1949 Apr-May 18 8 Hellman, Lillian. 1941 Sep 8 18 9 Henderson, George Wylie. 1946 Oct; 1947 Jan 18 10 Johnson, Josephine. ca. 1935; 1940 Sept-1942 Feb; 1949; no date 18 11 Kruger, Fania. 1936 Oct-1947 18 12 Lennon, Florence Becker. 1945 June-1946 Apr 18 13 Lomask, Milton. 1939 Nov-Dec 18 14 Petry, Ann. 1946 Apr 3 18 15 Todd, Helen. 1938 Sept-Dec; 1940 Sept; 1941 Sept; 1942 Sept-Nov; 1943 July-Dec 18 16 Todd, Helen. 1944-1945 18 17 Todd, Helen. 1946-1947 18 18 Todd, Helen. 1948-1949 18 19 McWilliams, [ ]. 1942 Mar 18 20 The Writers' Conference in the Rocky Mountains-University of Colorado. 1935 Sept-Oct 18 21 The Writers' Conference in the Rocky Mountains-University of Colorado. 1936 Apr-1937 Jan; 1941 June 18 22 Sub-Sub-Series 6: Literary Organizations The Authors' Guild of the Authors' League of America, Inc. 1938 July-1940 Aug 18 23 The Authors' Guild of the Authors' League of America, Inc. 1941 Feb-1942 Feb; 1943 Nov 18 24 Constitution and By-Laws. 1947-1948 18 25 Pen and Brush. 1946 Jan-Mar 18 26 The Pioneers. Includes "In Tribute to Fannie Cook." 1946; 1947; 1948; 1949 18 27 Works Progress Administration (WPA) (Federal Writers' Project). 1937 Feb-Mar; 1938 Nov-1939 June 18 28 Sub-Sub-Series 7: Manuscript Repositories Missouri Historical Society. 1938 Sept-Nov; 1946; 1947; 1948; 1949 Sept 18 29 Western Historical Manuscripts Collection-University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. 1944 Oct-1945 Mar 18 30 Series II: Literary Productions Sub-Series A: Manuscripts Sub-Sub-Series 1: Fiction--Novels (Unpublished) Beyond the Clinic Window . 1937 19 1 My Father's Family . (typescript draft) no date 19 1a With Passion and with Pride: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont U.S. Army. Chapter I. (carbon typescript draft) 1942 Aug 19 2 Great Ajax! A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont U.S.A. Outline of novel. (typescript draft) 1942 Oct 19 3 Great Ajax! A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. 1822-1848 . Outline of novel. (typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections) 19 4 Great Ajax! A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. 1822-1848 . Carbon typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections. 19 5 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters I-II. (carbon typescript draft with autograph corrections) 19 6 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters III-VI. (holograph draft) 19 7 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters VII-X. (holograph draft) 19 8 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters XI-XIV. (holograph draft) 19 9 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Part II. Chapters I-IV. (holograph draft) 19 10 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Full-length manuscript. Annotations by Ann Watkins, Fannie Cook's literary agent. Chapters II-VI. Chapter I missing. (carbon typescript draft) 19 11 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters VII-XI. 19 12 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters XII-XVI. 19 13 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters XVII-IX. 20 1 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters XX-XIV. 20 2 In Astor's Empire: A Story of Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapters XV-XXVII. 20 3 Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapter I. Lovers in Exile. (typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 4 Surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A. Chapter I. Lovers in Exile. (carbon typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 5 The Story of William Beaumont . (first draft of first fourteen chapters) Chapters I-VII. (typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 6 The Story of William Beaumont . (first draft of first fourteen chapters) Chapters VIII-XIV. (typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 7 The Story of William Beaumont (first draft of first fourteen chapters). Chapters I-VII. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 8 The Story of William Beaumont (first draft of first fourteen chapters). Chapters VIII-XIV. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 9 [Title not yet selected] (This is the first draft of the first third of a novel based on the life of surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A.). Chapters I-VII. (typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 10 [Title not yet selected] (This is the first draft of the first third of a novel based on the life of surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A.). Chapters VIII-XIV. (typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 11 [Title not yet selected] (This is the first draft of the first third of a novel based on the life of surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A.). Chapters I-VII. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 12 [Title not yet selected] (This is the first draft of the first third of a novel based on the life of surgeon William Beaumont, U.S.A.). Chapters VIII-XI. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 20 13 Miscellaneous pages of drafts for Beaumont novel. 20 14 Miscellaneous notes/outlines for Beaumont novel. 20 15 Sub-Sub-Series 2: Fiction--Novels (Published) Mrs. Palmer's Honey 1945 Oct-Nov Pp. 1-62. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 1945 21 1 Pp. 63-124. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 1945 21 2 Pp. 125-191. (with additional inserted pages bearing autograph revisions) (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 1945 21 3 Part II. Pp. 193-260. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 1945 21 4 Pp. 261-315. (with autograph revisions) (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 1945 21 5 Pp. 316-378. (carbon typescript with autograph revisions and corrections) 1945 21 6 Notes for corrections of manuscript. 1945 21 7 Publisher's copy edited manuscript. (Doubleday and Company, Inc., 1946) 1945 Oct-Nov 21 8 Page proofs of front sheets. Book jacket. 1946 21 9 Storm Against the Wall Part I. 1904-1910. (carbon typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections) 1904-1910 22 1 Part II. 1911-1917. (carbon typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections) 1911-1917 22 2 Part III. 1918-1935. (carbon typescript draft with autograph revisions and corrections) 1918-1935 22 3 Part IV. 1936-1946. 1936-1946 22 4 Publisher's copy edited manuscript. 1947 Oct 22 5 Miscellaneous notes/10 pp. of holograph draft - Part IV, Chapter XIII. No date 22 6 Page proofs of front sheets. No date 22 7 Typescripts of front sheets. No date 22 8 Original cover design. No date 22 9 Galley proofs. 1947 Dec 23 1 The Long Bridge 1949 "The Beginning - Autumn 1929." (carbon typescript draft with autograph revision and corrections) 1929 23 2 "The Middle - May 1930." (carbon typescript draft with autograph revision and corrections) 1930 23 3 "The End - Autumn 1930 to January 1931." (carbon typescript draft with autograph revision and corrections) 1930-1931 23 4 Sub-Sub-Series 3: Fiction--Short Stories "The Amalgomated Hears Something." (typescript, 22 pp.) no date 24 1 "And That Was What He Thought." (typescript, 21 pp. with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 24 2 "Beyond the Hill of Her Daily Thought." (typescript, 11 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 3 "Black Liberty." (typescript, 9 pp. (2200 words); revised typescript, 9 pp. (2100 words)) no date 24 4 "Bullets and Babies." (typescript, 4 pp., with autograph corrections) 1942 Nov 25 24 5 "The Business of Being a Bride." (typescript, 17 pp.) no date 24 6 "Cousin Oliver Said So." (typescript, 14 pp.) no date 24 7 "Dahilia-ing In an Up-Town Shop." (typescript, 2 pp. with autograph revisions; revised typescript, 2 pp.) no date 24 8 "Elephantiasis." Submitted October 1, 1930, for use in The Lion's Mouth of Harper's . (typescript and carbon typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 9 "Fathers and Phosphates." (typescript, 6 pp.) no date 24 10 "The Flowers That Bloom in the Spring." (typescript, 7 pp.) no date 24 11 "For Young and Old." (typescript, 8 pp) no date 24 12 "Gustav's Luck." (typescript, 5 pp.) no date 24 13 "Harmony Against Dissonance." Revision of "The Plan of the Second Floor." (B-25/F-19) (typescript, 16 pp.) no date 24 14 "Having Ranked Third." See also "Invisible Banner." (B-24/F-19) (typescript, 6 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 15 "Holiday Morning." (typescript, 11 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 16 "I Met a Floater." (typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 24 17 "In Search of Heaven." (typescript, 10 pp.; carbon typescript, 10 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 24 18 "Invisible Banner." Revisions of "Having Ranked Third." (B-24/F-15) (typescript, 7 pp.) no date 24 19 "Jennie Buys a Weapon." (typescript, 21 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 20 "Jim Brady's Paws." (typescript, 19 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 21 "A Kid to Support." (typescript, 7 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 22 "Life and Letters." (typescript, 23 pp.) no date 24 23 "Life's Handicap." (typescript, 9 pp.) no date 24 24 "Love Wears an Old Cloak." (typescript, 9 pp.) no date 24 25 "Man-Catching." (carbon typescript, 4 pp.; typescript, 4 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions; revised typescript, 6 pp.) no date 24 26 "A Marriageable Daughter." (typescript, 26 pp.) no date 24 27 "A Member of the Household." (typescript, 4 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 28 "Mountains at Twilight." (typescript, 16 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 29 "Mr. Marian Anderson." Submitted to Southwest Review , May 1947. (typescript, 4 pp.) no date 24 30 "Mrs. B. Dowser Mimmpff Reports." (typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 31 "Mrs. Crump Repeats Herself." (typescript, 10 pp.) no date 24 32 "The O'Gills in Danger." (typescript, 36 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 24 33 "Only a Goat." (carbon typescript, 12 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions no date 24 34 "Only From a Rival." A vignette for The American Review . (typescript, 2 pp.) no date 24 35 "Our Helen of Troy." (typescript, 17 pp.) 1923 Dec 17 24 36 "A Pearl of Heart and a Ruby Arrow." See also "Steeped in Maidenhood." (B-25/F-12) (typescript, 13 pp.) no date 25 1 "The Pilgrims Vote." (typescript, 19 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 2 "The Plan of the Second Floor." See also "Harmony Against Dissonance." (B-24/F-14) (typescript, 22 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 3 "Presents From Uncle Herman." (typescript, 19 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 4 "Principles vs. Pigeons." (typescript and carbon typescript, 42 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 5 "Sara's Brother." (typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 25 6 "The Sergeants and the City." (typescript, 16 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 7 "A Silly Man." (typescript, 6 pp.) no date 25 8 "Sisters." (carbon typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions; typescript, 8 pp., with numerous autograph corrections and revisions; revised typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 9 "Sons in Khaki." (typescript, 15 pp.) no date 25 10 "Stars Above the Desert." (typescript, 6 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 11 "Steeped in Maidenhood." Two copies, one titled "Purity." See also "A Pearl Heart and a Ruby Arrow." (B-25/F-1) (typescript, 13 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 12 "The Story of the Little Boy with the Dirty Face." (typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 13 "Take Amelia Romano." (carbon typescript, 9 pp. with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 25 14 "Tea for Me." (typescript, 13 pp.) no date 25 15 "That Drab Name." (typescript, 14 pp; revised typescript, 9 pp.) no date 25 16 "They Live Forever." (typescript, 21 pp.) no date 25 17 "Tom Cartright's Wife." (typescript and carbon typescript, 32 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 25 18 "Twinges." (typescript, 20 pp.) no date 25 19 "Unhappy Capitalism - A Fable." (typescript, 2 pp. with autograph corrections and revision) no date 25 20 "Whatever Comes." (typescript, 15 pp.) no date 25 21 "When She Could Get It." (typescript, 8 pp.) no date 25 22 "Which." (typescript, 1 p.) no date 25 23 "The Widow Levi." (typescript, 22 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 25 24 "With Orchids on My Shoulder." (typescript, 23 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 25 25 Untitled [The Reverend Mr. Scott's struggle for his people based on the conversion of Jefferson School into a vocational school for colored boys and girls]. (typescript, 32 pp.) no date 25 26 Sub-Sub-Series 4: Non-Fiction--M.A. Thesis Social Problems and the English Drama of Today . (carbon typescript, 64 pp., bibI. 6 pp.; holograph notes for corrections of manuscript, 2 pp.) 1916 May 15 26 1 Sub-Sub-Series 5: Non-Fiction--Articles/Essays "Approval or Appraisal?" (typescript and carbon typescript, 6 pp.) no date 26 2 "Artic Journalism." Written for the Colophon (typescript, 20 pp., bibl. 1 p.; carbon typescript with autograph corrections and revisions). Photostats of pages from The North Georgia Gazette , and Winter Chronicle . (See also B-26/F-10-12, and B-30/F-28) 1938 Jan 18 26 3 "Are the Ladies Inconsistent?" (carbon typescripts (2 copies), 20 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions on each copy) 1934 May 31 26 4 "As If They Were Her Own." (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph revision) no date 26 5 "Because You Gave. . . .Another True Story with False Names." Three vignettes of persons aided by the St. Louis Committee for Service to Emigrants. (carbon typescripts, 3 pp., with autograph revisions) (case studies from the Agency also in folder, 14 pp.) no date 26 6 "Carlyle's Heroes and Hero-Worship." (typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions; one page with eight questions regarding the article also in folder) no date 26 7 "Cropperville Gets a School." For the Negro Digest (carbon typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 26 8 "Does America Want Freedom of Religion?" (typescript, 4 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 26 9 "Drama in the Arctic." (typescript, 11 pp., with autograph corrections) (See also B-26/F-3, 11, 12 and B-30/F-28) no date 26 10 "A Dramatic Season in the Arctic." Typescript and carbon typescript, 12 pp., with autograph notes, corrections and revisions. Pp. 6, 7 and 10 missing from carbon typescript copy. (see also B-26/F-3, 10, 12) no date 26 11 "A Dramatic Season in the Arctic." Partial ms. of revised version: Typescript, 12 pp. (7 missing) with autograph notes and revisions. Carbon typescript, 12 pp. (6 missing). Partial ms. of untitled version: Typescript, 16 pp. (3 missing). Carbon typescript, 16 pp. (5 missing), with autograph corrections and revision. Extra carbon pp. (see also B-26/F-3, 10, 11 and B-30/F28) no date 26 12 "The Englishman at His Inn." (typescript, 9 pp., with autograph corrections and revision) Three English postcards in folder. no date 26 13 "Equal Rights Amendment - Prohibitive Legislation." (carbon typescript, 4 pp., with autograph note and corrections) no date 26 14 "A Federal Marriage." (typescript, 11 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 26 15 "Going over to the Other Side." (typescript, 3 pp., with autograph corrections; two copies) no date 26 16 "The Great Social Necessity." (typescript, 3 pp., with autograph corrections; two copies) no date 26 17 "I Chose Public Schools." (typescript, 10 pp.) no date 26 18 "I Have Outwitted My Allergies." (holograph draft, 25 pp.) no date 26 19 "Is Concealment Good Conciliation?" (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph revisions) no date 26 20 "The Mature Englishman." (typescript, 4 pp., with autograph revisions). Five English postcards with autograph notes in folder. no date 26 21 [Memorial for Jennie N.A. Jones, English teacher]. (typescript, 2 pp.; p. 1 missing) no date 26 22 "The Missouri Okies Remained at Home." (typescript, 8 pp., with notes and corrections) no date 26 23 "The Missouri Sharecropper Bolts His Union." (typescript, 7 pp.) no date 26 24 "Now. . . .the New Year." News Notes for the Ethical Society's newsletter. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) [1947] 26 25 "A Patriotic Theme." (typescript, 3 pp., with autograph corrections) 1942 Nov 25 26 26 "Picnic-Living in Wartime." (typescript, 4 pp.) no date 26 27 "Rachel Stix Michael." (carbon typescript, 4 pp., with autograph revisions) 1943 Feb 26 28 "Riveting for the Carver Foundation." (typescript, 4 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 26 29 "Romance in Missouri." (typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 26 30 "Stop-Over Privileges Only." (typescript, 10 pp., with autograph revisions) no date 26 31 "The Story of a Hero" (Elias Michael). (carbon typescript, 3 pp.) no date 26 32 [The Story of Roadside Demonstration - Cropperville - Delmo Homes]. (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p., with autograph corrections and revisions) 1947 June 5 26 33 "Strike Violence." (typescript, 7 pp.) no date 26 34 "That Club Paper." (typescript, 6 pp., with autograph notes and corrections) no date 26 35 "Volunteer Professionals: A Red Cross Experiment." (typescript, 6 pp., with autograph notes, corrections and revisions) no date 26 36 "What Are the Essential Qualities of the Woman Leader?" (carbon typescript, 1 p., with autograph revision) no date 26 37 "What! No Maids?" (carbon typescript, 6 pp.) no date 26 38 "What's Wrong With the Relationship?" (typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections and revisions) no date 26 39 "Why I Am for Henry Wallace." For the Writers for Wallace booklet. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1948 Sept 29 26 40 "A Woman's Fear of Cancer." (carbon typescript, 10 pp.) no date 26 41 "Women and Fascism." (carbon typescript, 3 pp.) no date 26 42 Untitled [And what, pray tell, is happening to the drama?]. (typescript, 4 pp.) no date 26 43 Untitled [Comments on Henry David Gray's theory of the origin of the First Quarto Hamlet]. (carbon typescript, 10 pp., bibl. 1 p., with autograph corrections; holograph draft, 19 pp., bibl. 1 p.; holograph research notes, 5 pp.; correspondence regarding manuscript) 1916, 1918 26 44 Untitled [Comments on F.G. Hubbard's "Marcellus theory" of the First Quarto Hamlet]. (typescript, 4 pp.) no date 26 45 Untitled [Slum clearance]. (typescript, 1 p., with autograph revisions) no date 26 46 Sub-Sub-Series 6: Non-Fiction--Play Review The Swan by Ferenc Molnar. Theatre Program with autograph notes. Presented by the Webster Groves Theatre Guild, April 27, 1936. (carbon typescript, 3 pp.) no date 27 3 Sub-Sub-Series 7: Non-Fiction--Book Reviews Alexander Pope by Edith Sitwell. (carbon typescript, 3 pp., with autograph revisions) no date 27 1 Armor of Light by Tracy D. Mygatt and Frances Witherspoon. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1930 May 19 27 1 Bolio and Other Dogs by Archibald Rutledge. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 1 The Conqueror's Lady: Innes Suarez by Stella Burke May. (carbon typescript, 1 p., with autograph corrections and revision) no date 27 1 The Devil's Spoon by Theodora Du Bois. (carbon typescript, 2 pp.) no date 27 1 Domitila by Paulo Setubal. Translated and adapted from the Portuguese by Margaret Richardson. (carbon typescript, 2 pp.) no date 27 1 Firehead by Lola Ridge. (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 27 1 The Good Estate of Poetry by Chauncey Brewster Tinker. 27 1 The Garment of Praise by Eleanor Carroll Chilton and Herbert Agar. (carbon typescript, 4 pp.) no date 27 1 Half-Gods by Sidney Howard. (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 27 1 In Araby Orion by Edward Thompson. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1930 Oct 23 27 1 June Moon by Ringer Larhner and George S. Kaufman. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 1 Last and First Love by Abel Hermant. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 1 Life and Myself by Giovanni Papini. (carbon typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 27 1 The Man of Promise by Willard Huntington Wright. (carbon typescript, 3 pp.) no date 27 2 The New Humanism by Leon Samson. Draft #1 (carbon typescript, 4 pp., with autograph corrections); draft #2 (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph notes). no date 27 2 Meteor by S.N. Behrman. (typescript, page 1 of 3, with autograph revisions; carbon typescript, 3 pp.) no date 27 2 The Road of the Gods by Isabel Paterson. (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph revisions) no date 27 2 The School of Femininity by Margaret Lawrence. Published version of review from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch . (1 p.) no date 27 2 Simple Confession by Baird Leonard. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1930 Oct 23 27 2 Tales From The Argentine . Edited by Waldo Frank. Translated by Anita Brenner. (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph revisions) no date 27 2 Ventilations - Being Biographical Asides by Hesketh Pearson with caricatures by Eva Herrmann. (carbon typescript, 2 pp.) no date 27 2 Waterloo Bridge by Robert E. Sherwood. (carbon typescript, undated, 2 pp., with autograph revision) no date 27 2 Waterloo Bridge by Robert E. Sherwood. (carbon typescript, 2 pp., with autograph revision) no date 27 2 Sub-Sub-Series 8: Non-Fiction--Editorials Editorials for The Bulletin published by the League of Women Voters. "Race Relations and Schools." (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1927 Dec 12 27 4 "The Situation at Sumner." (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1928 June 25 27 4 Untitled [Women's Rights]. (carbon typescript, 1 p.) 1937 Apr 11 27 4 "Reorganizing the Reorganization Plan." (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 4 "Folk Fascism in Missouri." (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 5 Sub-Sub-Series 9: Non-Fiction--Radio Scripts "Architecture of Eric Mendelsohn." (carbon typescript, 14 pp., with autograph revisions). Art For Your Sake Program. 5:15-5:30 p.m., City Art Museum. 1944 Mar 13 27 6 "WPA Prints." (carbon typescript, 12 pp.). Art For Your Sake Program. 5:15-5:30 p.m., City Art Museum. 1944 Apr 3 27 7 "The People's Art Center." (carbon typescript, 13 pp.). Art For Your Sake Program, 5:15-5:30 p.m., City Art Museum. 1944 June 5 27 8 "Pottery & Porcelain in the City Art Museum." (carbon typescript, 13 pp., with autograph revisions). Art In St. Louis Program, 5:15-5:30 p.m., City Art Museum. 1944 Oct 9 27 9 "Dr. Hopkins & Historical Society." (carbon typescript, 12 pp., with autograph revisions). Art In St. Louis Program, 5:15-5:30 p.m., City Art Museum. 1944 Oct 29 27 10 "Modern Sculpture." (carbon typescript, 14 pp., with autograph revisions). Art In St. Louis Program, 5:15-5:30 p.m., City Art Museum. 1944 Nov 9 27 11 Sub-Sub-Series 10: Non-Fiction--Brother's Memoirs, edited by Fannie Cook "Then and Now as Bill Frank Saw It." (typeset, 32 pp.) 1931 27 12 Sub-Sub-Series 11: Poetry "After a Cystoscopic Examination." (carbon typescript (2 copies), 1 p.) no date 27 13 "American Workingman." (typescript, 1 p.; carbon typescript (2 copies), 1 p.) no date 27 14 "Another Idol Stolen From the Temple." (typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 15 "Blood and Whispers." (See B-27/F-36). Also titled "In the Jungle." no date 27 15 "Bob Mirror on His 50th Birthday." (holograph draft, 2 pp.) no date 27 16 "Death-Bed of Capitalism." (typescript (5 copies), 1 p.; carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 17 "Disasters" (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.). Also titled "Alas!" (B-27/F-47) no date 27 18 "Exodus of the Share-Croppers: A Chant." (typescript, 8 pp.; carbon typescript, 8 pp., with autograph corrections) no date 27 19 "Home From High-School." (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 20 "I Do Not Love My Neighbor." (carbon typescript, 1 p.). Revised version: "My Upstairs Neighbor." (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 21 "In the Jungle." (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.). Also titled "Blood and Whispers." (B-27/F-36) no date 27 22 "Like Sons! Dawn Over Pearl Harbor." (typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 23 "The Man With the Baton." Written after a concert conducted by Fernandez Arbos. (typescript, 2 pp., with autograph revisions). Revised versions: "My Upstairs Neighbor." (See B-27/F-21) (typescript and carbon typescript with autograph revisions) 1934 Sept 27 24 "Night Comes." Four versions of poem. Typescript, undated, 1 p. (1 verse). Typescript, undated, 1 p. (3 verses). Carbon typescript, undated, 1 p. (3 verses). Carbon typescript, August 21, 1934, 1 p. (3 verses) 1934; no date 27 25 "Night Nurse." Five holograph drafts, 1 p. each. Carbon typescript, 1 p. with autograph revisions. Typescript and carbon typescript of revised version, 1 p. no date 27 26 "1934." (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 27 "Old Stuff." (See B-27/F--36) no date 27 27 "Our Age." (typescript, 1 p., with autograph notes and revisions) no date 27 28 "Our Hero." Also titled "Triolet Triste." (two typescripts, undated, 1 p.; carbon typescript, November 19, 1934, 1 p.) 1934; no date 27 29 "Ozark Hymn." (typescript, 1 p., with autograph revision) [1938] 27 30 "Ozark Shadows." (typescript, 1 p., with autograph revisions and corrections; carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 31 "Pecs." Three typescripts, undated, 1 p., with autograph corrections. Two carbon typescripts, undated, 1 p., with autograph revision on one copy. Newspaper clipping and editorial regarding the strike of 1200 miners at Pecs, Hungary, who remained underground for 5 days without food or water before a compromise agreement for more work and higher pay was reached. Clipping dated Oct. 16, 1934. 1934; no date 27 32 "Prophecy in White." (typescript, 1 p., with autograph correction). Poem credited to "A.B.C.... X.Y.Z." "Query." (See B-27/F-47) (Also titled "Which?") no date 27 33 "Rose Point." (typescript, 1 p., with autograph revisions; typescript and carbon typescript of revised versions, 1 p.) no date 27 34 "Saint Louis 1935." (four holograph drafts, 1 p. each; typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 35 "So the World Keeps on Turning"; "Old Stuff"; "Blood and Whispers." Submitted to the New Yorker . (typescript, 1 p., with carbon typescript, 1 p., with autograph note and revisions) no date 27 36 "Soldiers." (carbon typescript, 1 p., with autograph revisions) no date 27 37 "A Study in Contrasts." Five versions: 1. Typescript and carbon typescript with autograph revision, undated, 1 p.; 2. Typescript and carbon typescript of revised version with autograph revisions on carbon, undated, 1 p.; 3. Carbon typescript of revised version, September 16, 1934, 1 p.' 4. Typescript, undated, 1 p., with autograph revision and notation "ABC-XYZ Phyllis." Carbon typescript with autograph notation "Oct. 18, Good-House"; 5. Two typescripts of revised version, undated, 1 p., with autograph revisions on one copy. 1934; no date 27 38 "Suffrage." (See B-27/F-47) no date 27 38 "Talent for Trouble." (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 39 "Tittle-Tattle." (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 40 "Today." (carbon typescript, 1 p., with autograph revision) no date 27 41 "Triolet Triste." (See B-27/F-29) no date 27 41 "Voice of the American Mother." (five typescripts and four carbon typescripts, undated, 1 p.; one carbon copy dated November 19, 1934 - New Masses ) 1934; no date 27 42 "Which?" Also titled "Query." (typescript and carbon typescript, 1 p. each) no date 27 43 "Yaas'm." Two versions: 1) Two typescripts and one carbon typescript, undated, 1 p. Autograph note on one copy; "New Republic/Sept. 19, 1934" on one copy; correction on one copy. 2) Typescript of revised version. 1934; no date 27 44 Untitled [Little red school house!]. (holograph draft, 1 p.) no date 27 45 Untitled [The pine on the lawn with tears of wax...]. (holograph, 1 p.) no date 27 46 Miscellaneous: "Suffrage"; "Triolet"; "Query"; "Alas!" (carbon typescript, 1 p.) no date 27 47 Sub-Series B: Speeches Untitled [The Franklin School situation]. (holograph draft, unfinished, 3 p.) [1932] 28 1 "The Franklin School Situation." Prepared for radio broadcast in which the League of Women Voters of St. Louis presented the facts. (carbon typescript, 5 pp., with autograph corrections and revision; second draft, carbon typescript, 7 pp., with autograph revisions) [1932] 28 2 Statement to the Executive Board of the Community Council regarding the philosophy for settlement house service. (carbon typescript, 4 pp., with autograph revisions) 1932 Jan 2 28 3 "Against the Equal Rights Amendment." (typescript, 3 pp., with autograph revisions) [1934?] 28 4 "The Best Service a Private Duty Nurse Can Render Her Patient - The Viewpoint of a Layman." Speech given by FCC before the Private Duty Section of the State Convention of the Missouri Nurses Association. (typescript, 6 pp.) 1937 Oct 25 28 5 Untitled [Jim Crow - Public Enemy #1]. Presented at Urban League Friday luncheon. (carbon typescript, 1 p., autograph revisions) ca. 1940s 28 7 Presentation of the Award of Honor to Owen Whitfield at the annual dinner of the Urban League of St. Louis. (carbon typescript, 3 pp.) 1940 Jan 18 28 8 Untitled [Freedom for all...]. (typescript, 5 pp.) [1943] 28 9 Statement regarding segregation in St. Louis made over radio station KNOX. (typescript, 2 pp, with autograph notes and revisions; autograph notes and drawings on verso) 1944 Dec 24 28 10 Untitled [Race relations.. .a white problem]. Talk given to the Jewish Council. (holograph draft, 6 pp.) 1946 Jan 14 28 11 "Why We Favor Affiliation with the Progressive Citizens of America." Speaking for the Board of Directors of the Liberal Voters League. (carbon typescript (2 copies), 6 pp., with autograph revisions on one copy) [1947?] 28 12 "Art and Ethics." Radio broadcast over KWK, the Ethical Society Program, 10:15 a.m. (mimeograph, 4 pp.) 1949 July 3 28 13 Notes and outline for Franklin School speech. (holograph notes on 3"x5" cards) ca. 1932 28 14 Notes and outline for speech on the Equal Rights Amendment given in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (holograph notes on five 3"x5" cards; typescript notes, 2 pp.) 1935 May 8 28 15 Notes for talk given at the Ethical Society of St. Louis, 12:15-12:45 p.m., review of An American Dilemma by Gunner Myrdal. (holograph notes on five 4"x6" cards) 1945 Feb 13 28 16 Notes for talk given at the Ethical Society of St. Louis, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., review of An American Dilemma by Gunner Myrdal. (holograph notes on twelve 4"x6" cards) 1945 Feb 18 28 17 Talk given at the Webster Groves City Hall for an inter-racial group. (holograph notes on five 4"x6" cards) 1945 Sept 25 28 18 Various sets of notes regarding An American Dilemma by Gunner Myrdal. (holograph drafts, 35 pp.) ca. 1945 28 19 Notes for untitled speech regarding struggle for freedom. (holograph notes on six 3"x5" cards) no date 28 20 Notes for untitled speech regarding the fight for racial equality. (holograph notes on twelve 4"x6" cards) no date 28 21 Notes for untitled speech for Temple Israel Sisterhood. (holograph notes, 1 pp.) no date 28 22 Notes for speech "Ethics vs. Art." (holograph notes, 7 pp.) no date 28 23 Sub-Series C: Radio Interviews Radio talk by Estelle Askanasy over KXOK with interview of Fannie Cook at conclusion regarding The Hill Grows Steeper . (carbon typescript, 8 pp., with autograph notes and revisions) no date 28 24 Radio interview on Kay Morton's program, 10:30-11:00 a.m., regarding the publication of Boot-Heel Doctor . Introduction and questions. (typescript, 1 p., with autograph notes; holograph notes on seven 4"x6" cards) 1941 Sept 9 28 25 Questions and outline for radio interview on Doubleday program, KXLW, 3:05-4:00 p.m., republication of Storm Against the Wall and Fannie Cook's experience as a writer. (typescript, 1 p.) 1948 Apr 4 28 26 Questions and outline for radio interview on Diamond Time program, WKNA, 8:45-9:00 a.m., republication and writing of Storm Against the Wall . (typescript, 2 pp., with autograph notes) 1948 Dec 1 28 27 Radio interview on Home of the Free program, KFUO, regarding literature in contemporary America, 1941-1948. (typescript, 11 pp.) ca. 1948 28 28 Questions for radio interview on Just For Women program, WEW, 11:30-? a.m., regarding Fannie Cook's career as a writer. (typescript, 1 p., with autograph notes) 1949 Aug 2 28 29 Sub-Series D: Research Notes/Outlines for Literary Productions Research notes for article pertaining to The North Georgia Gazette and Winter Chronicle . (See B-26/F-3, 10-12) (holograph notes on seven 3"x5" cards) no date 28 30 Composition book with notes and pencil sketches regarding sharecroppers. (holograph notes, undated, 10 pp.) no date 28 31 Notes/Outlines for untitled novel. (typescript, 22 pp., with autograph notes) no date 28 32 Notes/Outlines for miscellaneous literary productions. (typescript (1 p.) and numerous holograph drafts) no date 28 33 Miscellaneous notes/pencil sketches. no date 28 34 Fannie Cook's notebook of English and American poetry. (typescript, 97 pp. with autograph notes and corrections) no date 28 35 Series III: Printed Materials Sub-Series A: Ephemera Fannie Cook's appointment calendar with autograph notes. 1947-1948 29 1 Brochures - Race Relations. "Calling the Next Witness: The Case of Democracy vs. Washington Univ." 1946 29 2 Brochure. "They Are Not Forgotten Published National Sharecroppers Week." 1942 May 1-8 29 3 Brochure. "Down with Starvation Wages in Southeast Missouri." Published by Local 313. UCAPAWA-ClO. 1942 May 29 3 Brochure. "In Regard to the Sharecropper?" no date 29 3 Brochure. "A Letter from the South: What Happened to the Missouri Sharecroppers Demonstrators?" from O.H. Whitfield, President, Missouri Sharecroppers Union & John Day, CIO Representative. no date 29 3 Circulars - Fifteen circulars regarding education, labor and race relation issues. 1933-1935; 1946-1947; no date 29 4 Flyer. "We Do Not Patronize the Forest City Mfg. Co. of St. Louis, MO." St. Louis Cotton Dress & Allied Industries Joint Board, International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. 1938 July 29 5 Flyer. "We Do Not Patronize the 'Nelly Don' Dress." Joint Board Kansas City, International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. ca. 1938 29 5 Flyer. "Bring Democracy to St. Louis with FEPO." Committee for FEPO. ca. 1945 29 5 Flyer for Fair Employment Practices Conference, Sunday, at 2:00 p.m. (sponsored by the St. Louis Com. for FEPO) 1946 May 5 29 5 Flyer. "An Open Letter to the President of The United States" from J.R. Butler, President, H.L. Mitchell, Secretary, Executive Council of Southern Tenant Farmers' Union. 1936 Nov 20 29 6 Flyers/Pamphlets. Three publications by the People's Institute of Applied Religion. 1946 29 7 Membership Cards. 1937; 1945 29 8 Memorandum. "Memorandum on the Current Epidemic of Race-Hatred Rumors," by Herbert Benjamin, President Missouri Communist Political Association. 194? 29 9 Monographs. The Disinherited Speak: Letters From Sharecroppers . Workers Defense League, Southern Tenant Farmers' Union. ca. 1937 29 10 Urban League of St. Louis: Twentieth Anniversary 1918 to 1938 . Fannie Cook's pencil sketches of people on four pages of the booklet. Program for the Twentieth Anniversary Celebration Dinner, January 12, 1939, also in folder. 1939 29 11 Sikeston: Hitlerite Crime Against America by William H. Patterson. Published by Communist Party of Missouri. 1942 Feb 29 12 Booklet: Sikeston: Hitlerite Crime Against America by William H. Patterson, February 1942 Sub-Series B: Press Releases United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing and Allied Workers of America - Affiliated with CIO, Washington, D.C. 29 13 "Sharecropper Delegates Arrive in Washington." 1940 Jan 15 "Sharecroppers Visit Mrs. Roosevelt." 1940 Jan "Sharecroppers Urge Rural Works Program." 1940 Jan [Third Annual Convention of the Southern States Cotton Council held at. Sharecroppers Camp, Harviell, Missouri]. 1941 June 17 Farm Security Administration, Sikeston, Missouri Untitled [FSA has launched first phase of five point plan for assistance in southeastern Missouri]. 1940 Mar 7 29 14 Sub-Series C: Tear Sheets Beifrage, Cedric. "Cotton-Patch Moses," Harper's Magazine . no date 29 15 Cook, Jerome E., M.D. "There is a Real Need for Public Guidance." Hospitals , Vol. 20. 1946 Apr 29 16 Drawings. no date 29 16a Sub-Series D: Programs Commencement Exercises (Fannie Cook's Graduation). University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. 1944 June 24 29 17 Programs in which Fannie Cook participated. Nineteen programs from public, religious and civic organizations' functions listing Cook as speaker. 1932-1949 29 18 Programs attended/supported by Fannie Cook. Fifteen programs from civic, religious and musical functions attended or supported by Cook. 1930-1949 29 19 Sub-Series E: Reports Brittanica Library Research Service. "The American Jew: 1905 to the Present." no date 29 20 Britannica Library Research Service. "The American Negro in the Twentieth Century." no date 29 21 Britannica Library Research Service. "Jewish Calendar of Events, 1893-1946." no date 29 22 Britannica Library Research Service. "Negro Calendar of Events, 1893-1946." no date 29 23 Communist Party of the United States. “Draft Resolution of the Negro Commission of the Communist Party of the United States on the Negro Question." 1946 July 10 29 24 Delmo Housing Corporation. "Social Survey of the Delmo Communities Southeast Missouri," by Newell Steward. 1947 July-Aug 29 25 Farm Security Administration. "An Area Adjustment of People to Land and Farm Labor Requirements." 1940 Sept 29 26 Farm Security Administration. "Homesteads." 1939 Jan 1 29 27 Farm Security Administration. "Second Anniversary LaForge Farms Resettlement Project." 1939 Dec 20 29 28 Harry Haywood. "On Agrarian Reforms for the Black Belt." 1946 July 29 29 Institute on Judaism and Race Relations. "Judaism and Race Relations - A Statement." 1945 Nov 29 30 Lively, C.E. "The Physical Status and Health of Farm Security Clients In Southeast Missouri. Preliminary Report No. 1," 1942 Apr; _______ and Lionberger, Herbert F. "The Physical Status and Health of Farm Tenants and Farm Laborers in Southeast Missouri. Preliminary Report No. 2," 1942 July. 1942 29 31 National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "An Informal Report on Attitudes in Southeast Missouri Relative to the Lynching of Cleo Wright, Negro, January 25, 1942," by Mr. and Mrs. Benoist Tompkins, St. Louis, Mo. 1942 Jan 29 32 Southern Tenant Farmers' Union. "Statement of Receipts and Disbursements, Southeast Missouri Relief Fund from January 1, 1939 to February 18, 1939." 1939 Jan-Feb 29 33 Southern Tenant Farmers' Union. "Statement of Cash Donations..." 1939 29 33 "Statement of Grocery and Clothing Donations..." 1939 29 33 Southern Tenant Farmers' Union. "Report of Relief Distribution..." 1939 29 33 United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing and Allied Workers of America - Congress of Industrial Organizations (UCAPAWA-ClO). "Southern States Cotton Council - Third Annual Convention - Abridged Proceedings." 1941 June 14-15 29 34 _____. "Southern States Cotton Council-Third Annual Convention - Program and Sharecropper Camp, Harviell, Missouri." 1941 June 14-15 29 35 "A Study of the Provision For the Care of Children of Negro Working Mothers." 1938 Nov 29 36 Typescript Wesley House annual report titled "12 Months of Fun, Fellowship, Friendliness During 1937 at Wesley House, St. Louis." 1937 29 37 Sub-Series F: Periodicals The American Journal of International Law Reprint of the "The U.S.S.R. and International Organizations," by Charles Prince. Inscription by author on first page: "To Dr. and Mrs. Jerome E. Cook/With high regards and well wishes./Charles Prince." 1942 July 30 1 The Crisis . "Ten Million Sharecroppers," by Mildred G. Freed, pp. 367-368 1939 Dec 30 2 School and Society , Vol. 40. Reprint of "American Education and the Negro," by James A. Scott, Charles Henry Turner School, St. Louis, Missouri. 1934 Nov 10 30 3 Washington University Alumni Bulletin . "Fannie Cook's New Book Acclaimed by Critics," p. 1. 1948 June 30 4 Weekly Bulletin of the Saint Louis Medical Society . "Report on Memphis, Tennessee, Milk Situation," by Dr. Jerome Cook, pp. 51-54. 1936 Oct 9 30 5 The Weekly Kansas City Star . Reprint of "100 Missouri Share Croppers Move Into a Land of Promise," by John M. Collins. 1938 Mar 30 30 6 Sub-Series G: Newsletters Agricultural Bulletin . Published by the National Council to Aid Agricultural Workers. Holograph letter on verso of p. 4. 1940 Apr; 1940 Aug 30 7 The Broadcast , printed by all Saints Church, St. Louis, Mo. 1946 Feb 17 30 7 Bulletin , No. 1. Published by the St. Louis Race Relations Commission. 1944 Dec 30 8 Bulletin , Vol. VII. Published by the Missouri State Nurses' Association. 1937 30 9 Bulletin . Issued by the Urban League of St. Louis. 1943 Aug; 1943 Oct; 1944 June; 1944 Sept; 1945 Mar 30 10 Christianity and Crisis . Sent to Fannie Cook by Adele Starbird with inscription at top of p. 3: "Dear Mrs. Cook - I thought this article ("Balance Sheet of the Negro in America," by William Stuart Nelson) might interest/you, not because it has anything new to you, but simply because it is another voice raised. Adele Starbird./Please don't return it." 1944 Mar 20 30 11 The Community Courier . Published by the Community Council of St. Louis. 1930 Nov 1 30 12 Congregational Christian Activities . Published by the Congregational Christian Conference of Missouri Publishers. Entire issue is article by Thad Snow, "Swamp Angel's Rebellion." 1947 Dec 30 13 Delmo Doings . Printed by and for our neighbors of the Delmo Homes. 1947 Feb; 1948 June 30 14 News Notes . Printed by the Ethical Society of St. Louis. 1948 Mar; 1949 Feb 30 15 Hadassah News . 1948 Apr 30 16 Hagedorn Book Shop Bulletin . 1946 Feb 30 16 The League Bulletin published by the League of Women Voters of St. Louis. 1929 Feb 23; 1929 Mar 9; 1936 Oct 10; 1937 Jan 30 30 17 The Missouri League News . 1934 Jan 30 17 The League Bulletin . Published by the Missouri League of Women Voters. 1945 May 30 17 The Light . Official Bulletin of Citizens Committee on Displaced Persons, New York, NY. 1947 Nov 15 30 18 Sub-Series H: Dramatization Mimmeograph of Vandercock's Black Majesty, 28 pp. Autograph note on front cover: "Dramatization of Vandercock's Black Majesty by a colored St. Louisan, Given Odeon." 1931 30 19 Sub-Series I: Newspaper Clippings Newspaper clippings regarding Fannie Cook. 1912; 1934-1949 30 20 Newspaper clippings regarding research performed by Dr. Jerome Cook; Harland Bartholomew; Negro Medical Association meeting; black schools in St. Louis, 1912-1937; and sharecroppers. 1936; 1937; 1939 30 21 Newspaper clippings of book reviews of The Hill Grows Steeper . 1938-1939 30 22 Newspaper clippings of book reviews of Boot-Heel Doctor . 1941 30 23 Newspaper clippings regarding Sikeston lynching, Cropperville, sharecroppers, and Farm Security Administration. 1942 30 24 Newspaper clippings regarding Delmo Labor Homes, sharecroppers, South-East Missouri, and St. Louis Race Relations Commission. 1944-1946 30 25 Newspaper clipsheet - "The Poll Tax Repealer." 1945 June 15 30 26 Newspaper clippings regarding appearance of Paul Robeson and Henry Wallace at Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis; profile of Josephine Johnson (Mrs. Grant Cannon). 1947 Nov 10; 1949 May 22 30 27 Sub-Series J: Rare Book The North Georgia Gazette , and Winter Chronicle . 2d ed., London: John Murray. This book inspired Fannie Cook to write an article about the establishment of the weekly newspaper on board ships employed in the discovery of the North-West passage. Various versions of the article are among her papers. (see B-26/F-3,10-12) 1822 30 28 Series IV: Photographic Material Family photographs. no date 30 29 Sharecroppers. no date 30 30 Miscellaneous. no date 30 31 Series V: Scrapbooks Edith Lowenstein's Girl Graduate Book, Soldan High School. 1913 Volume 1 Clippings/tear sheets, etc. of Fannie Cook's writings. 1921; 1930-1942 Volume 2 Missourians. 1933-1940 Volume 3 Sharecroppers. 1939-1941; 1943; 1945 Volume 4 Race Relations. 1944-1945 Volume 5 Public Service. 1946-1949 Volume 6 The Hill Grows Steeper . 1938 Volume 7 Boot Heel Doctor . 1941-1943 Volume 8 Mrs. Palmer's Honey volume 1 & 2. 1945 May-1946 Apr Volume 9 Mrs. Palmer's Honey . 1946-1947 Volume 10 Storm Against the Wall . 1948 Volume 11 Series VI: Addendum Correspondence. 1936; 1943; 1963 31 1 "Art and Ethics," 17 pp., and fragments, 3 pp. no date 31 2 "Art and Ethics." (carbon copy) no date 31 3 ["Art and Ethics"] fragments. no date 31 4 Book of poems. (holograph) no date 31 5 "Cynthia and the Chief." no date 31 6 "We Formed a Committee." no date 31 7 "The Crystal Feature." no date 31 8 "The Folk of Southeast Missouri." no date 31 9 "The Home That Cannot Succeed." no date 31 10 "Jennie Buys a Weapon." no date 31 11 "A Kid to Support." no date 31 12 "Making a Mountain." no date 31 13 "The Ten-Foot Pole." no date 31 14 "Shadows in the Household." no date 31 15 "We Forgot Jim Crow." no date 31 16 "A Woman About Town." (two copies) no date 31 17 "The Widow Levi." no date 31 18 "Ozark Shadows." (poem) no date 31 19 Mrs. Palmer's Honey . (miscellaneous pages) no date 31 20 Mrs. Palmer's Honey . (miscellaneous pages) no date 31 21 Mrs. Palmer's Honey . (miscellaneous pages) no date 31 22